Meeting needs of Muslim girls in school sport: Case studies exploring cultural and religious diversity

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Meeting needs of Muslim girls in school sport : Case studies exploring cultural and religious diversity. / Benn, Tansin; Pfister, Gertrud Ursula.

I: European Journal of Sport Science, Bind 13, Nr. 5, 2013, s. 567-574.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Benn, T & Pfister, GU 2013, 'Meeting needs of Muslim girls in school sport: Case studies exploring cultural and religious diversity', European Journal of Sport Science, bind 13, nr. 5, s. 567-574. https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2012.757808

APA

Benn, T., & Pfister, G. U. (2013). Meeting needs of Muslim girls in school sport: Case studies exploring cultural and religious diversity. European Journal of Sport Science, 13(5), 567-574. https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2012.757808

Vancouver

Benn T, Pfister GU. Meeting needs of Muslim girls in school sport: Case studies exploring cultural and religious diversity. European Journal of Sport Science. 2013;13(5):567-574. https://doi.org/10.1080/17461391.2012.757808

Author

Benn, Tansin ; Pfister, Gertrud Ursula. / Meeting needs of Muslim girls in school sport : Case studies exploring cultural and religious diversity. I: European Journal of Sport Science. 2013 ; Bind 13, Nr. 5. s. 567-574.

Bibtex

@article{96e766048e584e38b06d519ee25f980d,
title = "Meeting needs of Muslim girls in school sport: Case studies exploring cultural and religious diversity",
abstract = "This paper contains a sociocultural analysis of school sport experiences of Muslim girls in two countries with different gender policies in physical education (PE) classes: England and Denmark. In Denmark, PE lessons take place in co-educative classes, in England schools are more diverse, with predominantly co-educational but also single-sex and faith schools offering different learning contexts. Two case studies from Denmark and England are used to explore the experiences of migrant Muslim girls in these different settings. A social constructionist approach to gender underpins the interpretation of stakeholders’ voices on the inclusion of Muslim girls and the analysis of PE discourses in these countries. Findings illustrate similarities and differences at the interface of cultural diversity, political rhetoric of inclusion and realities of sport experiences for Muslim girls in both countries. Complex influences on PE experiences include gender stereotypes, cultural and religious orientations and practices, as well as actions and expectations of parents, communities and coaches/teachers. The studies provide insights into the ways participants managed their identities as Muslim girls in different sport environments to enable participation and retention of their cultural identities. Highlighted throughout the paper are the ways in which school sport policy and practice, providers and gatekeepers, can include or exclude groups, in this case Muslim girls. Too often coaches and teachers are unaware of crucial facts about their learners, not only in terms of their physical development and capabilities but also in terms of their cultural needs. Mistakes in creating conducive learning environments leave young people to negotiate a way to participate or refrain from participation.",
author = "Tansin Benn and Pfister, {Gertrud Ursula}",
note = "CURIS 2013 NEXS 002",
year = "2013",
doi = "10.1080/17461391.2012.757808",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "567--574",
journal = "European Journal of Sport Science",
issn = "1746-1391",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Meeting needs of Muslim girls in school sport

T2 - Case studies exploring cultural and religious diversity

AU - Benn, Tansin

AU - Pfister, Gertrud Ursula

N1 - CURIS 2013 NEXS 002

PY - 2013

Y1 - 2013

N2 - This paper contains a sociocultural analysis of school sport experiences of Muslim girls in two countries with different gender policies in physical education (PE) classes: England and Denmark. In Denmark, PE lessons take place in co-educative classes, in England schools are more diverse, with predominantly co-educational but also single-sex and faith schools offering different learning contexts. Two case studies from Denmark and England are used to explore the experiences of migrant Muslim girls in these different settings. A social constructionist approach to gender underpins the interpretation of stakeholders’ voices on the inclusion of Muslim girls and the analysis of PE discourses in these countries. Findings illustrate similarities and differences at the interface of cultural diversity, political rhetoric of inclusion and realities of sport experiences for Muslim girls in both countries. Complex influences on PE experiences include gender stereotypes, cultural and religious orientations and practices, as well as actions and expectations of parents, communities and coaches/teachers. The studies provide insights into the ways participants managed their identities as Muslim girls in different sport environments to enable participation and retention of their cultural identities. Highlighted throughout the paper are the ways in which school sport policy and practice, providers and gatekeepers, can include or exclude groups, in this case Muslim girls. Too often coaches and teachers are unaware of crucial facts about their learners, not only in terms of their physical development and capabilities but also in terms of their cultural needs. Mistakes in creating conducive learning environments leave young people to negotiate a way to participate or refrain from participation.

AB - This paper contains a sociocultural analysis of school sport experiences of Muslim girls in two countries with different gender policies in physical education (PE) classes: England and Denmark. In Denmark, PE lessons take place in co-educative classes, in England schools are more diverse, with predominantly co-educational but also single-sex and faith schools offering different learning contexts. Two case studies from Denmark and England are used to explore the experiences of migrant Muslim girls in these different settings. A social constructionist approach to gender underpins the interpretation of stakeholders’ voices on the inclusion of Muslim girls and the analysis of PE discourses in these countries. Findings illustrate similarities and differences at the interface of cultural diversity, political rhetoric of inclusion and realities of sport experiences for Muslim girls in both countries. Complex influences on PE experiences include gender stereotypes, cultural and religious orientations and practices, as well as actions and expectations of parents, communities and coaches/teachers. The studies provide insights into the ways participants managed their identities as Muslim girls in different sport environments to enable participation and retention of their cultural identities. Highlighted throughout the paper are the ways in which school sport policy and practice, providers and gatekeepers, can include or exclude groups, in this case Muslim girls. Too often coaches and teachers are unaware of crucial facts about their learners, not only in terms of their physical development and capabilities but also in terms of their cultural needs. Mistakes in creating conducive learning environments leave young people to negotiate a way to participate or refrain from participation.

U2 - 10.1080/17461391.2012.757808

DO - 10.1080/17461391.2012.757808

M3 - Journal article

VL - 13

SP - 567

EP - 574

JO - European Journal of Sport Science

JF - European Journal of Sport Science

SN - 1746-1391

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 43843168