Effect of vitamin D on inflammatory and clinical outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA): A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Effect of vitamin D on inflammatory and clinical outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) : A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. / Al-Saoodi, Hagir; Kolahdooz, Fariba; Andersen, Jens Rikardt; Jalili, Mahsa.

I: Nutrition Reviews, 2023.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Al-Saoodi, H, Kolahdooz, F, Andersen, JR & Jalili, M 2023, 'Effect of vitamin D on inflammatory and clinical outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA): A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials', Nutrition Reviews. https://doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuad083

APA

Al-Saoodi, H., Kolahdooz, F., Andersen, J. R., & Jalili, M. (2023). Effect of vitamin D on inflammatory and clinical outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA): A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Nutrition Reviews. https://doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuad083

Vancouver

Al-Saoodi H, Kolahdooz F, Andersen JR, Jalili M. Effect of vitamin D on inflammatory and clinical outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA): A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Nutrition Reviews. 2023. https://doi.org/10.1093/nutrit/nuad083

Author

Al-Saoodi, Hagir ; Kolahdooz, Fariba ; Andersen, Jens Rikardt ; Jalili, Mahsa. / Effect of vitamin D on inflammatory and clinical outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) : A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. I: Nutrition Reviews. 2023.

Bibtex

@article{dc3c91c030bb4031a82679f5fce66000,
title = "Effect of vitamin D on inflammatory and clinical outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA): A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials",
abstract = "Context: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that causessynovitis. Vitamin D deficiency is common in rheumatoid arthritis. Objective: This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated whether vitamin D supplementation affects the inflammatory and clinical outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis on the basis of randomized clinical trials. Data Sources: A literature search was performed in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, and Google Scholar for articles published until May 2022. Data Extraction: The studies were selected according to PRISMA guidelines, and the risk of bias was assessed for randomized controlled trials. Data Analysis: A random effects model was used to conduct a meta-analysis, and heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 statistic. Of 464 records, 11 studies were included from 3049 patients. Conclusion: Vitamin D supplementation did not significantly reduce C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28), or the health assessment questionnaire score; however, the response to supplementation was highly heterogeneous. The pooled analysis showed that vitamin D significantly reduced the pain–visual analogue scale (VAS) weighted mean difference (WMD¼ –1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] [–2.34, 27], P = .01), DAS28–CRP (WMD = –.58, 95% CI [–.86, –.31], P < .0001), and DAS28–ESR (WMD = –.58, 95% CI [–.86, –.31], P = .0001). Subgroup analysis for vitamin D doses (>100 mg per day versus <100 mg per day) showed that the higher doses had a more significant effect on CRP than the lower doses (P < .05).Conclusions: There was no significant difference between the effect of 2 vitamin D doses on ESR and DAS28. To minimize the high heterogeneity among studies in this meta-analysis, other confounding factors such as baseline vitamin D, age,dietary vitamin D, time of year, sun exposure, drug interaction, effect dosage, and power of study should be examined.",
keywords = "Faculty of Science, Inflammation, Meta-analysis, Rheumatoid arthritis, Systematic review, Vitamin D",
author = "Hagir Al-Saoodi and Fariba Kolahdooz and Andersen, {Jens Rikardt} and Mahsa Jalili",
note = "CURIS 2023 NEXS 169",
year = "2023",
doi = "10.1093/nutrit/nuad083",
language = "English",
journal = "Nutrition Reviews",
issn = "0029-6643",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of vitamin D on inflammatory and clinical outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA)

T2 - A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

AU - Al-Saoodi, Hagir

AU - Kolahdooz, Fariba

AU - Andersen, Jens Rikardt

AU - Jalili, Mahsa

N1 - CURIS 2023 NEXS 169

PY - 2023

Y1 - 2023

N2 - Context: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that causessynovitis. Vitamin D deficiency is common in rheumatoid arthritis. Objective: This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated whether vitamin D supplementation affects the inflammatory and clinical outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis on the basis of randomized clinical trials. Data Sources: A literature search was performed in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, and Google Scholar for articles published until May 2022. Data Extraction: The studies were selected according to PRISMA guidelines, and the risk of bias was assessed for randomized controlled trials. Data Analysis: A random effects model was used to conduct a meta-analysis, and heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 statistic. Of 464 records, 11 studies were included from 3049 patients. Conclusion: Vitamin D supplementation did not significantly reduce C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28), or the health assessment questionnaire score; however, the response to supplementation was highly heterogeneous. The pooled analysis showed that vitamin D significantly reduced the pain–visual analogue scale (VAS) weighted mean difference (WMD¼ –1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] [–2.34, 27], P = .01), DAS28–CRP (WMD = –.58, 95% CI [–.86, –.31], P < .0001), and DAS28–ESR (WMD = –.58, 95% CI [–.86, –.31], P = .0001). Subgroup analysis for vitamin D doses (>100 mg per day versus <100 mg per day) showed that the higher doses had a more significant effect on CRP than the lower doses (P < .05).Conclusions: There was no significant difference between the effect of 2 vitamin D doses on ESR and DAS28. To minimize the high heterogeneity among studies in this meta-analysis, other confounding factors such as baseline vitamin D, age,dietary vitamin D, time of year, sun exposure, drug interaction, effect dosage, and power of study should be examined.

AB - Context: Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic inflammatory disease that causessynovitis. Vitamin D deficiency is common in rheumatoid arthritis. Objective: This systematic review and meta-analysis investigated whether vitamin D supplementation affects the inflammatory and clinical outcomes in patients with rheumatoid arthritis on the basis of randomized clinical trials. Data Sources: A literature search was performed in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, and Google Scholar for articles published until May 2022. Data Extraction: The studies were selected according to PRISMA guidelines, and the risk of bias was assessed for randomized controlled trials. Data Analysis: A random effects model was used to conduct a meta-analysis, and heterogeneity was assessed using the I2 statistic. Of 464 records, 11 studies were included from 3049 patients. Conclusion: Vitamin D supplementation did not significantly reduce C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), disease activity score in 28 joints (DAS28), or the health assessment questionnaire score; however, the response to supplementation was highly heterogeneous. The pooled analysis showed that vitamin D significantly reduced the pain–visual analogue scale (VAS) weighted mean difference (WMD¼ –1.30, 95% confidence interval [CI] [–2.34, 27], P = .01), DAS28–CRP (WMD = –.58, 95% CI [–.86, –.31], P < .0001), and DAS28–ESR (WMD = –.58, 95% CI [–.86, –.31], P = .0001). Subgroup analysis for vitamin D doses (>100 mg per day versus <100 mg per day) showed that the higher doses had a more significant effect on CRP than the lower doses (P < .05).Conclusions: There was no significant difference between the effect of 2 vitamin D doses on ESR and DAS28. To minimize the high heterogeneity among studies in this meta-analysis, other confounding factors such as baseline vitamin D, age,dietary vitamin D, time of year, sun exposure, drug interaction, effect dosage, and power of study should be examined.

KW - Faculty of Science

KW - Inflammation

KW - Meta-analysis

KW - Rheumatoid arthritis

KW - Systematic review

KW - Vitamin D

U2 - 10.1093/nutrit/nuad083

DO - 10.1093/nutrit/nuad083

M3 - Review

C2 - 37437898

JO - Nutrition Reviews

JF - Nutrition Reviews

SN - 0029-6643

ER -

ID: 357842715