The Glycaemic Index-Food-Frequency Questionnaire: Development and validation of a food frequency questionnaire designed to estimate the dietary intake of glycaemic index and glycaemic load: An effort by the PREVIEW Consortium

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Standard

The Glycaemic Index-Food-Frequency Questionnaire: Development and validation of a food frequency questionnaire designed to estimate the dietary intake of glycaemic index and glycaemic load : An effort by the PREVIEW Consortium. / Brouwer-Brolsma, Elske M; Berendsen, Agnes D; Sluik, Diewertje; van de Wiel, Anne M; Raben, Anne; de Vries, Jeanne H M; Brand-Miller, Jennie; Feskens, Edith J M.

I: Nutrients, Bind 11, Nr. 1, 13, 2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Brouwer-Brolsma, EM, Berendsen, AD, Sluik, D, van de Wiel, AM, Raben, A, de Vries, JHM, Brand-Miller, J & Feskens, EJM 2019, 'The Glycaemic Index-Food-Frequency Questionnaire: Development and validation of a food frequency questionnaire designed to estimate the dietary intake of glycaemic index and glycaemic load: An effort by the PREVIEW Consortium', Nutrients, bind 11, nr. 1, 13. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11010013

APA

Brouwer-Brolsma, E. M., Berendsen, A. D., Sluik, D., van de Wiel, A. M., Raben, A., de Vries, J. H. M., ... Feskens, E. J. M. (2019). The Glycaemic Index-Food-Frequency Questionnaire: Development and validation of a food frequency questionnaire designed to estimate the dietary intake of glycaemic index and glycaemic load: An effort by the PREVIEW Consortium. Nutrients, 11(1), [13]. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11010013

Vancouver

Brouwer-Brolsma EM, Berendsen AD, Sluik D, van de Wiel AM, Raben A, de Vries JHM o.a. The Glycaemic Index-Food-Frequency Questionnaire: Development and validation of a food frequency questionnaire designed to estimate the dietary intake of glycaemic index and glycaemic load: An effort by the PREVIEW Consortium. Nutrients. 2019;11(1). 13. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11010013

Author

Brouwer-Brolsma, Elske M ; Berendsen, Agnes D ; Sluik, Diewertje ; van de Wiel, Anne M ; Raben, Anne ; de Vries, Jeanne H M ; Brand-Miller, Jennie ; Feskens, Edith J M. / The Glycaemic Index-Food-Frequency Questionnaire: Development and validation of a food frequency questionnaire designed to estimate the dietary intake of glycaemic index and glycaemic load : An effort by the PREVIEW Consortium. I: Nutrients. 2019 ; Bind 11, Nr. 1.

Bibtex

@article{fa8eb464ebfd47db81ab5eff445845ba,
title = "The Glycaemic Index-Food-Frequency Questionnaire: Development and validation of a food frequency questionnaire designed to estimate the dietary intake of glycaemic index and glycaemic load: An effort by the PREVIEW Consortium",
abstract = "Dietary glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) are indices used to quantify the effect of carbohydrate quality and quantity on postprandial glycaemia. GI/GL-health associations are widely studied but data on the validity of integrated GI/GL measurements are scarce. We evaluated the performance of a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) specifically developed to assess GI/GL. In total, 263 Dutch men and 212 women (aged 55 ± 11 years) completed a 58-item GI-FFQ, an 183-item general-FFQ and a 2-day 24 h-recall and donated blood for glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) determination. The level of agreement between these methods was evaluated by (1) crossclassification, (2) correlations and (3) Bland and Altman plots. The three dietary assessment methods provided comparable mean intake estimates for total carbohydrates (range: 214–237 g/day), mono/disaccharides (100–107 g/day), polysaccharides (114–132 g/day), as well as bread, breakfast cereals, potatoes, pasta, rice, fruit, dairy, cakes/cookies and sweets. Mean (±SD) GI estimates were also comparable between the GI-FFQ (54 ± 3), general-FFQ (53 ± 4) and 24 h-recalls (53 ± 5). Mean (±SD) GI-FFQ GL (117 ± 37) was slightly lower than the general-FFQ GL (126 ± 38) and 24 h-recalls GL (127 ± 37). Classification of GI in quartiles was identical for the GI-FFQ and general-FFQ for 43{\%} of the population (r = 0.58) and with 24 h-recalls for 35{\%} of the population (de-attenuated r = 0.64). For GL, this was 48{\%} (r = 0.65) and 44{\%} (de-attenuated r = 0.74). Correlations between GI and HbA1c were low (r = −0.09 for GI-FFQ, r = −0.04 for general-FFQ and r = 0.07 for 24 h-recalls). In conclusion, compared to a general-FFQ and 24 h-recalls, the GI-FFQ showed a moderate to good relative validity for carbohydrates, carbohydrate-rich foods and GI/GL. No metric predicted HbA1c.",
keywords = "Faculty of Science, Glycaemic index (GI), Glycaemic load, Carbohydrates, FFQ, 24 h-recall, Validation, Dietary assessment",
author = "Brouwer-Brolsma, {Elske M} and Berendsen, {Agnes D} and Diewertje Sluik and {van de Wiel}, {Anne M} and Anne Raben and {de Vries}, {Jeanne H M} and Jennie Brand-Miller and Feskens, {Edith J M}",
note = "CURIS 2019 NEXS 008",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.3390/nu11010013",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "Nutrients",
issn = "2072-6643",
publisher = "M D P I AG",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Glycaemic Index-Food-Frequency Questionnaire: Development and validation of a food frequency questionnaire designed to estimate the dietary intake of glycaemic index and glycaemic load

T2 - An effort by the PREVIEW Consortium

AU - Brouwer-Brolsma, Elske M

AU - Berendsen, Agnes D

AU - Sluik, Diewertje

AU - van de Wiel, Anne M

AU - Raben, Anne

AU - de Vries, Jeanne H M

AU - Brand-Miller, Jennie

AU - Feskens, Edith J M

N1 - CURIS 2019 NEXS 008

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Dietary glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) are indices used to quantify the effect of carbohydrate quality and quantity on postprandial glycaemia. GI/GL-health associations are widely studied but data on the validity of integrated GI/GL measurements are scarce. We evaluated the performance of a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) specifically developed to assess GI/GL. In total, 263 Dutch men and 212 women (aged 55 ± 11 years) completed a 58-item GI-FFQ, an 183-item general-FFQ and a 2-day 24 h-recall and donated blood for glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) determination. The level of agreement between these methods was evaluated by (1) crossclassification, (2) correlations and (3) Bland and Altman plots. The three dietary assessment methods provided comparable mean intake estimates for total carbohydrates (range: 214–237 g/day), mono/disaccharides (100–107 g/day), polysaccharides (114–132 g/day), as well as bread, breakfast cereals, potatoes, pasta, rice, fruit, dairy, cakes/cookies and sweets. Mean (±SD) GI estimates were also comparable between the GI-FFQ (54 ± 3), general-FFQ (53 ± 4) and 24 h-recalls (53 ± 5). Mean (±SD) GI-FFQ GL (117 ± 37) was slightly lower than the general-FFQ GL (126 ± 38) and 24 h-recalls GL (127 ± 37). Classification of GI in quartiles was identical for the GI-FFQ and general-FFQ for 43% of the population (r = 0.58) and with 24 h-recalls for 35% of the population (de-attenuated r = 0.64). For GL, this was 48% (r = 0.65) and 44% (de-attenuated r = 0.74). Correlations between GI and HbA1c were low (r = −0.09 for GI-FFQ, r = −0.04 for general-FFQ and r = 0.07 for 24 h-recalls). In conclusion, compared to a general-FFQ and 24 h-recalls, the GI-FFQ showed a moderate to good relative validity for carbohydrates, carbohydrate-rich foods and GI/GL. No metric predicted HbA1c.

AB - Dietary glycaemic index (GI) and glycaemic load (GL) are indices used to quantify the effect of carbohydrate quality and quantity on postprandial glycaemia. GI/GL-health associations are widely studied but data on the validity of integrated GI/GL measurements are scarce. We evaluated the performance of a food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) specifically developed to assess GI/GL. In total, 263 Dutch men and 212 women (aged 55 ± 11 years) completed a 58-item GI-FFQ, an 183-item general-FFQ and a 2-day 24 h-recall and donated blood for glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) determination. The level of agreement between these methods was evaluated by (1) crossclassification, (2) correlations and (3) Bland and Altman plots. The three dietary assessment methods provided comparable mean intake estimates for total carbohydrates (range: 214–237 g/day), mono/disaccharides (100–107 g/day), polysaccharides (114–132 g/day), as well as bread, breakfast cereals, potatoes, pasta, rice, fruit, dairy, cakes/cookies and sweets. Mean (±SD) GI estimates were also comparable between the GI-FFQ (54 ± 3), general-FFQ (53 ± 4) and 24 h-recalls (53 ± 5). Mean (±SD) GI-FFQ GL (117 ± 37) was slightly lower than the general-FFQ GL (126 ± 38) and 24 h-recalls GL (127 ± 37). Classification of GI in quartiles was identical for the GI-FFQ and general-FFQ for 43% of the population (r = 0.58) and with 24 h-recalls for 35% of the population (de-attenuated r = 0.64). For GL, this was 48% (r = 0.65) and 44% (de-attenuated r = 0.74). Correlations between GI and HbA1c were low (r = −0.09 for GI-FFQ, r = −0.04 for general-FFQ and r = 0.07 for 24 h-recalls). In conclusion, compared to a general-FFQ and 24 h-recalls, the GI-FFQ showed a moderate to good relative validity for carbohydrates, carbohydrate-rich foods and GI/GL. No metric predicted HbA1c.

KW - Faculty of Science

KW - Glycaemic index (GI)

KW - Glycaemic load

KW - Carbohydrates

KW - FFQ

KW - 24 h-recall

KW - Validation

KW - Dietary assessment

U2 - 10.3390/nu11010013

DO - 10.3390/nu11010013

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30577531

VL - 11

JO - Nutrients

JF - Nutrients

SN - 2072-6643

IS - 1

M1 - 13

ER -

ID: 210195337