Protein from meat or vegetable sources in meals matched for fiber content has similar effects on subjective appetite sensations and energy intake - A randomized acute cross-over meal test study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Protein from meat or vegetable sources in meals matched for fiber content has similar effects on subjective appetite sensations and energy intake - A randomized acute cross-over meal test study. / Nielsen, Lone Vestergaard; Kristensen, Marlene D; Klingenberg, Lars; Ritz, Christian; Belza, Anita; Astrup, Arne; Raben, Anne.

I: Nutrients, Bind 10, Nr. 1, 96, 2018.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Nielsen, LV, Kristensen, MD, Klingenberg, L, Ritz, C, Belza, A, Astrup, A & Raben, A 2018, 'Protein from meat or vegetable sources in meals matched for fiber content has similar effects on subjective appetite sensations and energy intake - A randomized acute cross-over meal test study', Nutrients, bind 10, nr. 1, 96. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010096

APA

Nielsen, L. V., Kristensen, M. D., Klingenberg, L., Ritz, C., Belza, A., Astrup, A., & Raben, A. (2018). Protein from meat or vegetable sources in meals matched for fiber content has similar effects on subjective appetite sensations and energy intake - A randomized acute cross-over meal test study. Nutrients, 10(1), [96]. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010096

Vancouver

Nielsen LV, Kristensen MD, Klingenberg L, Ritz C, Belza A, Astrup A o.a. Protein from meat or vegetable sources in meals matched for fiber content has similar effects on subjective appetite sensations and energy intake - A randomized acute cross-over meal test study. Nutrients. 2018;10(1). 96. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010096

Author

Nielsen, Lone Vestergaard ; Kristensen, Marlene D ; Klingenberg, Lars ; Ritz, Christian ; Belza, Anita ; Astrup, Arne ; Raben, Anne. / Protein from meat or vegetable sources in meals matched for fiber content has similar effects on subjective appetite sensations and energy intake - A randomized acute cross-over meal test study. I: Nutrients. 2018 ; Bind 10, Nr. 1.

Bibtex

@article{92bfda3410a84bbca9de1434672b396c,
title = "Protein from meat or vegetable sources in meals matched for fiber content has similar effects on subjective appetite sensations and energy intake - A randomized acute cross-over meal test study",
abstract = "Higher-protein meals decrease hunger and increase satiety compared to lower-protein meals. However, no consensus exists about the different effects of animal and vegetable proteins on appetite. We investigated how a meal based on vegetable protein (fava beans/split peas) affected ad libitum energy intake and appetite sensations, compared to macronutrient-balanced, iso-caloric meals based on animal protein (veal/pork or eggs). Thirty-five healthy men were enrolled in this acute cross-over study. On each test day, participants were presented with one of four test meals (~3550 kilojoules (kJ) 19{\%} of energy from protein), based on fava beans/split peas (28.5 g fiber), pork/veal or eggs supplemented with pea fiber to control for fiber content (28.5 g fiber), or eggs without supplementation of fiber (6.0 g fiber). Subjective appetite sensations were recorded at baseline and every half hour until the ad libitum meal three hours later. There were no differences in ad libitum energy intake across test meals (p > 0.05). Further, no differences were found across meals for hunger, satiety, fullness, prospective food consumption, or composite appetite score (all p > 0.05). Iso-caloric, macronutrient-balanced, fiber-matched meals based on vegetable protein (fava beans/split peas) or animal protein (veal/pork or eggs) had similar effects on ad libitum energy intake and appetite sensations.",
keywords = "Animal protein, Fava beans, Split pea, Veal, Pork, Bean, Satiety, Egg",
author = "Nielsen, {Lone Vestergaard} and Kristensen, {Marlene D} and Lars Klingenberg and Christian Ritz and Anita Belza and Arne Astrup and Anne Raben",
note = "CURIS 2018 NEXS 038",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.3390/nu10010096",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "Nutrients",
issn = "2072-6643",
publisher = "M D P I AG",
number = "1",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Protein from meat or vegetable sources in meals matched for fiber content has similar effects on subjective appetite sensations and energy intake - A randomized acute cross-over meal test study

AU - Nielsen, Lone Vestergaard

AU - Kristensen, Marlene D

AU - Klingenberg, Lars

AU - Ritz, Christian

AU - Belza, Anita

AU - Astrup, Arne

AU - Raben, Anne

N1 - CURIS 2018 NEXS 038

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Higher-protein meals decrease hunger and increase satiety compared to lower-protein meals. However, no consensus exists about the different effects of animal and vegetable proteins on appetite. We investigated how a meal based on vegetable protein (fava beans/split peas) affected ad libitum energy intake and appetite sensations, compared to macronutrient-balanced, iso-caloric meals based on animal protein (veal/pork or eggs). Thirty-five healthy men were enrolled in this acute cross-over study. On each test day, participants were presented with one of four test meals (~3550 kilojoules (kJ) 19% of energy from protein), based on fava beans/split peas (28.5 g fiber), pork/veal or eggs supplemented with pea fiber to control for fiber content (28.5 g fiber), or eggs without supplementation of fiber (6.0 g fiber). Subjective appetite sensations were recorded at baseline and every half hour until the ad libitum meal three hours later. There were no differences in ad libitum energy intake across test meals (p > 0.05). Further, no differences were found across meals for hunger, satiety, fullness, prospective food consumption, or composite appetite score (all p > 0.05). Iso-caloric, macronutrient-balanced, fiber-matched meals based on vegetable protein (fava beans/split peas) or animal protein (veal/pork or eggs) had similar effects on ad libitum energy intake and appetite sensations.

AB - Higher-protein meals decrease hunger and increase satiety compared to lower-protein meals. However, no consensus exists about the different effects of animal and vegetable proteins on appetite. We investigated how a meal based on vegetable protein (fava beans/split peas) affected ad libitum energy intake and appetite sensations, compared to macronutrient-balanced, iso-caloric meals based on animal protein (veal/pork or eggs). Thirty-five healthy men were enrolled in this acute cross-over study. On each test day, participants were presented with one of four test meals (~3550 kilojoules (kJ) 19% of energy from protein), based on fava beans/split peas (28.5 g fiber), pork/veal or eggs supplemented with pea fiber to control for fiber content (28.5 g fiber), or eggs without supplementation of fiber (6.0 g fiber). Subjective appetite sensations were recorded at baseline and every half hour until the ad libitum meal three hours later. There were no differences in ad libitum energy intake across test meals (p > 0.05). Further, no differences were found across meals for hunger, satiety, fullness, prospective food consumption, or composite appetite score (all p > 0.05). Iso-caloric, macronutrient-balanced, fiber-matched meals based on vegetable protein (fava beans/split peas) or animal protein (veal/pork or eggs) had similar effects on ad libitum energy intake and appetite sensations.

KW - Animal protein

KW - Fava beans

KW - Split pea

KW - Veal

KW - Pork

KW - Bean

KW - Satiety

KW - Egg

U2 - 10.3390/nu10010096

DO - 10.3390/nu10010096

M3 - Journal article

VL - 10

JO - Nutrients

JF - Nutrients

SN - 2072-6643

IS - 1

M1 - 96

ER -

ID: 188677100