Obesity as an adaptation to a high-fat diet: Evidence from a cross-sectional study

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Standard

Obesity as an adaptation to a high-fat diet : Evidence from a cross-sectional study. / Astrup, Arne; Buemann, Benjamin; Western, Philip; Toubro, Søren; Raben, Anne; Christensen, Niels Juel.

I: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Bind 59, Nr. 2, 1994, s. 350-355.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Astrup, A, Buemann, B, Western, P, Toubro, S, Raben, A & Christensen, NJ 1994, 'Obesity as an adaptation to a high-fat diet: Evidence from a cross-sectional study', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, bind 59, nr. 2, s. 350-355.

APA

Astrup, A., Buemann, B., Western, P., Toubro, S., Raben, A., & Christensen, N. J. (1994). Obesity as an adaptation to a high-fat diet: Evidence from a cross-sectional study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 59(2), 350-355.

Vancouver

Astrup A, Buemann B, Western P, Toubro S, Raben A, Christensen NJ. Obesity as an adaptation to a high-fat diet: Evidence from a cross-sectional study. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1994;59(2):350-355.

Author

Astrup, Arne ; Buemann, Benjamin ; Western, Philip ; Toubro, Søren ; Raben, Anne ; Christensen, Niels Juel. / Obesity as an adaptation to a high-fat diet : Evidence from a cross-sectional study. I: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 1994 ; Bind 59, Nr. 2. s. 350-355.

Bibtex

@article{eec0ca0d2e234e0194779d16a6eea728,
title = "Obesity as an adaptation to a high-fat diet: Evidence from a cross-sectional study",
abstract = "Expansion of the fat stores has been proposed as a prerequisite for increasing fat oxidation in response to a high-fat diet in individuals with a predisposition to obesity. In a cross-sectional design we measured 24-h substrate oxidations on a standardized diet in 38 overweight or obese and 35 nonobese women. Fat oxidation (g/d) was mainly a function of total energy requirements (r = 0.71, P < 0.0001). To account for this we used for further analysis oxidative fat energy ({\%}), a counterpart to dietary fat energy ({\%}). After differences in fat energy of consumed food ({\%}), age, and 24-h energy balance were adjusted for, obese women had higher oxidative fat energy than did nonobese women [40.2{\%} (37.8-42.6) vs 36.0{\%} (33.6-38.5), P < 0.02]. Adjusted oxidative fat energy ({\%}) increased with increasing size of fat mass (r = 0.31, P < 0.01). This relation suggests that a 10-kg change in fat mass may be caused by a change in dietary fat energy of > 1.6{\%} (0.4-2.7{\%}). The study supports the concept that in susceptible individuals the expansion of fat stores is a prerequisite to increase the oxidative fat energy to an amount commensurate with a high percentage of dietary fat energy.",
keywords = "Adaptation to a high-fat diet, Body composition, Dietary composition, Fat oxidation, Fatness, Indirect calorimetry, Obesity, Substrate utilization, Weight gain",
author = "Arne Astrup and Benjamin Buemann and Philip Western and S{\o}ren Toubro and Anne Raben and Christensen, {Niels Juel}",
year = "1994",
language = "English",
volume = "59",
pages = "350--355",
journal = "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Obesity as an adaptation to a high-fat diet

T2 - Evidence from a cross-sectional study

AU - Astrup, Arne

AU - Buemann, Benjamin

AU - Western, Philip

AU - Toubro, Søren

AU - Raben, Anne

AU - Christensen, Niels Juel

PY - 1994

Y1 - 1994

N2 - Expansion of the fat stores has been proposed as a prerequisite for increasing fat oxidation in response to a high-fat diet in individuals with a predisposition to obesity. In a cross-sectional design we measured 24-h substrate oxidations on a standardized diet in 38 overweight or obese and 35 nonobese women. Fat oxidation (g/d) was mainly a function of total energy requirements (r = 0.71, P < 0.0001). To account for this we used for further analysis oxidative fat energy (%), a counterpart to dietary fat energy (%). After differences in fat energy of consumed food (%), age, and 24-h energy balance were adjusted for, obese women had higher oxidative fat energy than did nonobese women [40.2% (37.8-42.6) vs 36.0% (33.6-38.5), P < 0.02]. Adjusted oxidative fat energy (%) increased with increasing size of fat mass (r = 0.31, P < 0.01). This relation suggests that a 10-kg change in fat mass may be caused by a change in dietary fat energy of > 1.6% (0.4-2.7%). The study supports the concept that in susceptible individuals the expansion of fat stores is a prerequisite to increase the oxidative fat energy to an amount commensurate with a high percentage of dietary fat energy.

AB - Expansion of the fat stores has been proposed as a prerequisite for increasing fat oxidation in response to a high-fat diet in individuals with a predisposition to obesity. In a cross-sectional design we measured 24-h substrate oxidations on a standardized diet in 38 overweight or obese and 35 nonobese women. Fat oxidation (g/d) was mainly a function of total energy requirements (r = 0.71, P < 0.0001). To account for this we used for further analysis oxidative fat energy (%), a counterpart to dietary fat energy (%). After differences in fat energy of consumed food (%), age, and 24-h energy balance were adjusted for, obese women had higher oxidative fat energy than did nonobese women [40.2% (37.8-42.6) vs 36.0% (33.6-38.5), P < 0.02]. Adjusted oxidative fat energy (%) increased with increasing size of fat mass (r = 0.31, P < 0.01). This relation suggests that a 10-kg change in fat mass may be caused by a change in dietary fat energy of > 1.6% (0.4-2.7%). The study supports the concept that in susceptible individuals the expansion of fat stores is a prerequisite to increase the oxidative fat energy to an amount commensurate with a high percentage of dietary fat energy.

KW - Adaptation to a high-fat diet

KW - Body composition

KW - Dietary composition

KW - Fat oxidation

KW - Fatness

KW - Indirect calorimetry

KW - Obesity

KW - Substrate utilization

KW - Weight gain

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0027979143&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 7993398

AN - SCOPUS:0027979143

VL - 59

SP - 350

EP - 355

JO - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 209802708