Higher protein intake is not associated with decreased kidney function in pre-diabetic older adults following a one-year intervention: A PREVIEW sub-study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Higher protein intake is not associated with decreased kidney function in pre-diabetic older adults following a one-year intervention : A PREVIEW sub-study. / Møller, Grith; Andersen, Jens Rikardt; Ritz, Christian; Silvestre, Marta P; Navas-Carretero, Santiago; Jalo, Elli; Christensen, Pia; Simpson, Elizabeth M; Taylor, Moira A; Martinez, J Alfredo; Macdonald, Ian; Swindell, Nils; Mackintosh, Kelly; Stratton, Gareth; Fogelholm, Mikael; Larsen, Thomas Meinert; Poppitt, Sally D; Dragsted, Lars Ove; Raben, Anne.

I: Nutrients, Bind 54, 54, 2018.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Møller, G, Andersen, JR, Ritz, C, Silvestre, MP, Navas-Carretero, S, Jalo, E, Christensen, P, Simpson, EM, Taylor, MA, Martinez, JA, Macdonald, I, Swindell, N, Mackintosh, K, Stratton, G, Fogelholm, M, Larsen, TM, Poppitt, SD, Dragsted, LO & Raben, A 2018, 'Higher protein intake is not associated with decreased kidney function in pre-diabetic older adults following a one-year intervention: A PREVIEW sub-study', Nutrients, bind 54, 54. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010054

APA

Møller, G., Andersen, J. R., Ritz, C., Silvestre, M. P., Navas-Carretero, S., Jalo, E., ... Raben, A. (2018). Higher protein intake is not associated with decreased kidney function in pre-diabetic older adults following a one-year intervention: A PREVIEW sub-study. Nutrients, 54, [54]. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010054

Vancouver

Møller G, Andersen JR, Ritz C, Silvestre MP, Navas-Carretero S, Jalo E o.a. Higher protein intake is not associated with decreased kidney function in pre-diabetic older adults following a one-year intervention: A PREVIEW sub-study. Nutrients. 2018;54. 54. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10010054

Author

Møller, Grith ; Andersen, Jens Rikardt ; Ritz, Christian ; Silvestre, Marta P ; Navas-Carretero, Santiago ; Jalo, Elli ; Christensen, Pia ; Simpson, Elizabeth M ; Taylor, Moira A ; Martinez, J Alfredo ; Macdonald, Ian ; Swindell, Nils ; Mackintosh, Kelly ; Stratton, Gareth ; Fogelholm, Mikael ; Larsen, Thomas Meinert ; Poppitt, Sally D ; Dragsted, Lars Ove ; Raben, Anne. / Higher protein intake is not associated with decreased kidney function in pre-diabetic older adults following a one-year intervention : A PREVIEW sub-study. I: Nutrients. 2018 ; Bind 54.

Bibtex

@article{867ce9d70d3f412582f759451fb4124c,
title = "Higher protein intake is not associated with decreased kidney function in pre-diabetic older adults following a one-year intervention: A PREVIEW sub-study",
abstract = "Concerns about detrimental renal effects of a high-protein intake have been raised due to an induced glomerular hyperfiltration, since this may accelerate the progression of kidney disease. The aim of this sub-study was to assess the effect of a higher intake of protein on kidney function in pre-diabetic men and women, aged 55 years and older. Analyses were based on baseline and one-yeardata in a sub-group of 310 participants included in the PREVIEW project (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World). Protein intake was estimated from four-day dietary records and 24-hour urinary urea excretion. We used linear regression to assess the association between protein intake after one year of intervention andkidney function markers: creatinine clearance, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR), urinary urea/creatinine ratio (UCR), serum creatinine, and serum urea before and after adjustments for potential confounders. A higher protein intake was associated with a significant increase in UCR (p = 0.03) and serum urea (p = 0.05) after one year. There wereno associations between increased protein intake and creatinine clearance, eGFR, ACR, or serum creatinine. We found no indication of impaired kidney function after one year with a higher protein intake in pre-diabetic older adults.",
keywords = "Faculty of Science, Pre-diabetes, Dietary protein, Creatinine clearance, Glomerular filtration rate, Albumin, Urea",
author = "Grith M{\o}ller and Andersen, {Jens Rikardt} and Christian Ritz and Silvestre, {Marta P} and Santiago Navas-Carretero and Elli Jalo and Pia Christensen and Simpson, {Elizabeth M} and Taylor, {Moira A} and Martinez, {J Alfredo} and Ian Macdonald and Nils Swindell and Kelly Mackintosh and Gareth Stratton and Mikael Fogelholm and Larsen, {Thomas Meinert} and Poppitt, {Sally D} and Dragsted, {Lars Ove} and Anne Raben",
note = "CURIS 2018 NEXS 021",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.3390/nu10010054",
language = "English",
volume = "54",
journal = "Nutrients",
issn = "2072-6643",
publisher = "M D P I AG",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Higher protein intake is not associated with decreased kidney function in pre-diabetic older adults following a one-year intervention

T2 - A PREVIEW sub-study

AU - Møller, Grith

AU - Andersen, Jens Rikardt

AU - Ritz, Christian

AU - Silvestre, Marta P

AU - Navas-Carretero, Santiago

AU - Jalo, Elli

AU - Christensen, Pia

AU - Simpson, Elizabeth M

AU - Taylor, Moira A

AU - Martinez, J Alfredo

AU - Macdonald, Ian

AU - Swindell, Nils

AU - Mackintosh, Kelly

AU - Stratton, Gareth

AU - Fogelholm, Mikael

AU - Larsen, Thomas Meinert

AU - Poppitt, Sally D

AU - Dragsted, Lars Ove

AU - Raben, Anne

N1 - CURIS 2018 NEXS 021

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Concerns about detrimental renal effects of a high-protein intake have been raised due to an induced glomerular hyperfiltration, since this may accelerate the progression of kidney disease. The aim of this sub-study was to assess the effect of a higher intake of protein on kidney function in pre-diabetic men and women, aged 55 years and older. Analyses were based on baseline and one-yeardata in a sub-group of 310 participants included in the PREVIEW project (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World). Protein intake was estimated from four-day dietary records and 24-hour urinary urea excretion. We used linear regression to assess the association between protein intake after one year of intervention andkidney function markers: creatinine clearance, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR), urinary urea/creatinine ratio (UCR), serum creatinine, and serum urea before and after adjustments for potential confounders. A higher protein intake was associated with a significant increase in UCR (p = 0.03) and serum urea (p = 0.05) after one year. There wereno associations between increased protein intake and creatinine clearance, eGFR, ACR, or serum creatinine. We found no indication of impaired kidney function after one year with a higher protein intake in pre-diabetic older adults.

AB - Concerns about detrimental renal effects of a high-protein intake have been raised due to an induced glomerular hyperfiltration, since this may accelerate the progression of kidney disease. The aim of this sub-study was to assess the effect of a higher intake of protein on kidney function in pre-diabetic men and women, aged 55 years and older. Analyses were based on baseline and one-yeardata in a sub-group of 310 participants included in the PREVIEW project (PREVention of diabetes through lifestyle Intervention and population studies in Europe and around the World). Protein intake was estimated from four-day dietary records and 24-hour urinary urea excretion. We used linear regression to assess the association between protein intake after one year of intervention andkidney function markers: creatinine clearance, estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR), urinary urea/creatinine ratio (UCR), serum creatinine, and serum urea before and after adjustments for potential confounders. A higher protein intake was associated with a significant increase in UCR (p = 0.03) and serum urea (p = 0.05) after one year. There wereno associations between increased protein intake and creatinine clearance, eGFR, ACR, or serum creatinine. We found no indication of impaired kidney function after one year with a higher protein intake in pre-diabetic older adults.

KW - Faculty of Science

KW - Pre-diabetes

KW - Dietary protein

KW - Creatinine clearance

KW - Glomerular filtration rate

KW - Albumin

KW - Urea

U2 - 10.3390/nu10010054

DO - 10.3390/nu10010054

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 29315212

VL - 54

JO - Nutrients

JF - Nutrients

SN - 2072-6643

M1 - 54

ER -

ID: 188161183