Body mass index trajectories in early childhood in relation to cardiometabolic risk profile and body composition at 5 years of age

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Body mass index trajectories in early childhood in relation to cardiometabolic risk profile and body composition at 5 years of age. / Wibæk Christensen, Rasmus; Vistisen, Dorte; Girma, Tsinuel; Admassu Wossen, Bitiya; Abera Mengistie, Mubarek; Abdissa, Alemseged; Mudie, Kissi; Kæstel, Pernille; Jørgensen, Marit E; Wells, Jonathan C K; Michaelsen, Kim F; Friis, Henrik; Andersen, Gregers Stig.

I: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Bind 110, Nr. 5, 2019, s. 1175-1185.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Wibæk Christensen, R, Vistisen, D, Girma, T, Admassu Wossen, B, Abera Mengistie, M, Abdissa, A, Mudie, K, Kæstel, P, Jørgensen, ME, Wells, JCK, Michaelsen, KF, Friis, H & Andersen, GS 2019, 'Body mass index trajectories in early childhood in relation to cardiometabolic risk profile and body composition at 5 years of age', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, bind 110, nr. 5, s. 1175-1185. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqz170

APA

Wibæk Christensen, R., Vistisen, D., Girma, T., Admassu Wossen, B., Abera Mengistie, M., Abdissa, A., ... Andersen, G. S. (2019). Body mass index trajectories in early childhood in relation to cardiometabolic risk profile and body composition at 5 years of age. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 110(5), 1175-1185. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqz170

Vancouver

Wibæk Christensen R, Vistisen D, Girma T, Admassu Wossen B, Abera Mengistie M, Abdissa A o.a. Body mass index trajectories in early childhood in relation to cardiometabolic risk profile and body composition at 5 years of age. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2019;110(5):1175-1185. https://doi.org/10.1093/ajcn/nqz170

Author

Wibæk Christensen, Rasmus ; Vistisen, Dorte ; Girma, Tsinuel ; Admassu Wossen, Bitiya ; Abera Mengistie, Mubarek ; Abdissa, Alemseged ; Mudie, Kissi ; Kæstel, Pernille ; Jørgensen, Marit E ; Wells, Jonathan C K ; Michaelsen, Kim F ; Friis, Henrik ; Andersen, Gregers Stig. / Body mass index trajectories in early childhood in relation to cardiometabolic risk profile and body composition at 5 years of age. I: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2019 ; Bind 110, Nr. 5. s. 1175-1185.

Bibtex

@article{352aaa3ba15c4feea3af93ad43e4aa99,
title = "Body mass index trajectories in early childhood in relation to cardiometabolic risk profile and body composition at 5 years of age",
abstract = "Background: Both impaired and accelerated postnatal growth have been associated with adult risks of obesity and cardiometabolic diseases, like type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, the timing of the onset of cardiometabolic changes and the specific growth trajectories linking early growth with later disease risks are not well understood.Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify distinct trajectories of BMI growth from 0 to 5 y and examine their associations with body composition and markers of cardiometabolic risk at age 5 y.Methods: In a prospective birth cohort study of 453 healthy and term Ethiopian children with BMIs assessed a median of 9 times during follow-up, we identified subgroups of distinct BMI trajectories in early childhood using latent class trajectory modeling. Associations of the identified growth trajectories with cardiometabolic markers and body composition at 5 y were analyzed using multiple linear regression analyses in 4 adjustment models for each outcome.Results: We identified 4 heterogeneous BMI growth trajectories: stable low BMI (19.2{\%}), normal BMI (48.8{\%}), rapid catch-up to high BMI (17.9{\%}), and slow catch-up to high BMI (14.1{\%}). Compared with the normal BMI trajectory, children in the rapid catch-up to high BMI trajectory had higher triglycerides (TGs) (range of β-coefficients in Models 1-4: 19-21{\%}), C-peptides (23-25{\%}), fat masses (0.48-0.60 kg), and fat-free masses (0.50-0.77 kg) across the 4 adjustment models. Children in the stable low BMI trajectory had lower LDL cholesterol concentrations (0.14-0.17 mmol/L), HDL cholesterol concentrations (0.05-0.09 mmol/L), fat masses (0.60-0.64 kg), and fat-free masses (0.35-0.49 kg), but higher TGs (11-13{\%}).Conclusions: The development of obesity and cardiometabolic risks may be established already in early childhood; thus, our data provide a further basis for timely interventions targeted at young children from low-income countries with unfavorable growth patterns. The birth cohort was registered at ISRCTN as ISRCTN46718296.",
keywords = "Faculty of Science, Body composition, Cohort study, Child, Developmental origins of health and disease, Growth, Latent class trajectory analysis, Noncommunicable diseases, Sub-Saharan Africa",
author = "{Wib{\ae}k Christensen}, Rasmus and Dorte Vistisen and Tsinuel Girma and {Admassu Wossen}, Bitiya and {Abera Mengistie}, Mubarek and Alemseged Abdissa and Kissi Mudie and Pernille K{\ae}stel and J{\o}rgensen, {Marit E} and Wells, {Jonathan C K} and Michaelsen, {Kim F} and Henrik Friis and Andersen, {Gregers Stig}",
note = "CURIS 2019 NEXS 296 Copyright {\circledC} American Society for Nutrition 2019.",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1093/ajcn/nqz170",
language = "English",
volume = "110",
pages = "1175--1185",
journal = "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Body mass index trajectories in early childhood in relation to cardiometabolic risk profile and body composition at 5 years of age

AU - Wibæk Christensen, Rasmus

AU - Vistisen, Dorte

AU - Girma, Tsinuel

AU - Admassu Wossen, Bitiya

AU - Abera Mengistie, Mubarek

AU - Abdissa, Alemseged

AU - Mudie, Kissi

AU - Kæstel, Pernille

AU - Jørgensen, Marit E

AU - Wells, Jonathan C K

AU - Michaelsen, Kim F

AU - Friis, Henrik

AU - Andersen, Gregers Stig

N1 - CURIS 2019 NEXS 296 Copyright © American Society for Nutrition 2019.

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Background: Both impaired and accelerated postnatal growth have been associated with adult risks of obesity and cardiometabolic diseases, like type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, the timing of the onset of cardiometabolic changes and the specific growth trajectories linking early growth with later disease risks are not well understood.Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify distinct trajectories of BMI growth from 0 to 5 y and examine their associations with body composition and markers of cardiometabolic risk at age 5 y.Methods: In a prospective birth cohort study of 453 healthy and term Ethiopian children with BMIs assessed a median of 9 times during follow-up, we identified subgroups of distinct BMI trajectories in early childhood using latent class trajectory modeling. Associations of the identified growth trajectories with cardiometabolic markers and body composition at 5 y were analyzed using multiple linear regression analyses in 4 adjustment models for each outcome.Results: We identified 4 heterogeneous BMI growth trajectories: stable low BMI (19.2%), normal BMI (48.8%), rapid catch-up to high BMI (17.9%), and slow catch-up to high BMI (14.1%). Compared with the normal BMI trajectory, children in the rapid catch-up to high BMI trajectory had higher triglycerides (TGs) (range of β-coefficients in Models 1-4: 19-21%), C-peptides (23-25%), fat masses (0.48-0.60 kg), and fat-free masses (0.50-0.77 kg) across the 4 adjustment models. Children in the stable low BMI trajectory had lower LDL cholesterol concentrations (0.14-0.17 mmol/L), HDL cholesterol concentrations (0.05-0.09 mmol/L), fat masses (0.60-0.64 kg), and fat-free masses (0.35-0.49 kg), but higher TGs (11-13%).Conclusions: The development of obesity and cardiometabolic risks may be established already in early childhood; thus, our data provide a further basis for timely interventions targeted at young children from low-income countries with unfavorable growth patterns. The birth cohort was registered at ISRCTN as ISRCTN46718296.

AB - Background: Both impaired and accelerated postnatal growth have been associated with adult risks of obesity and cardiometabolic diseases, like type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. However, the timing of the onset of cardiometabolic changes and the specific growth trajectories linking early growth with later disease risks are not well understood.Objectives: The aim of this study was to identify distinct trajectories of BMI growth from 0 to 5 y and examine their associations with body composition and markers of cardiometabolic risk at age 5 y.Methods: In a prospective birth cohort study of 453 healthy and term Ethiopian children with BMIs assessed a median of 9 times during follow-up, we identified subgroups of distinct BMI trajectories in early childhood using latent class trajectory modeling. Associations of the identified growth trajectories with cardiometabolic markers and body composition at 5 y were analyzed using multiple linear regression analyses in 4 adjustment models for each outcome.Results: We identified 4 heterogeneous BMI growth trajectories: stable low BMI (19.2%), normal BMI (48.8%), rapid catch-up to high BMI (17.9%), and slow catch-up to high BMI (14.1%). Compared with the normal BMI trajectory, children in the rapid catch-up to high BMI trajectory had higher triglycerides (TGs) (range of β-coefficients in Models 1-4: 19-21%), C-peptides (23-25%), fat masses (0.48-0.60 kg), and fat-free masses (0.50-0.77 kg) across the 4 adjustment models. Children in the stable low BMI trajectory had lower LDL cholesterol concentrations (0.14-0.17 mmol/L), HDL cholesterol concentrations (0.05-0.09 mmol/L), fat masses (0.60-0.64 kg), and fat-free masses (0.35-0.49 kg), but higher TGs (11-13%).Conclusions: The development of obesity and cardiometabolic risks may be established already in early childhood; thus, our data provide a further basis for timely interventions targeted at young children from low-income countries with unfavorable growth patterns. The birth cohort was registered at ISRCTN as ISRCTN46718296.

KW - Faculty of Science

KW - Body composition

KW - Cohort study

KW - Child

KW - Developmental origins of health and disease

KW - Growth

KW - Latent class trajectory analysis

KW - Noncommunicable diseases

KW - Sub-Saharan Africa

U2 - 10.1093/ajcn/nqz170

DO - 10.1093/ajcn/nqz170

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 31504088

VL - 110

SP - 1175

EP - 1185

JO - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 5

ER -

ID: 227472265