A systematic review and meta-analysis of nutrition therapy compared with dietary advice in patients with type 2 diabetes

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

A systematic review and meta-analysis of nutrition therapy compared with dietary advice in patients with type 2 diabetes. / Møller, Grith; Andersen, Henning Keinke; Snorgaard, Ole.

I: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Bind 106, Nr. 6, 2017, s. 1394-1400.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftReviewForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Møller, G, Andersen, HK & Snorgaard, O 2017, 'A systematic review and meta-analysis of nutrition therapy compared with dietary advice in patients with type 2 diabetes', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, bind 106, nr. 6, s. 1394-1400. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.139626

APA

Møller, G., Andersen, H. K., & Snorgaard, O. (2017). A systematic review and meta-analysis of nutrition therapy compared with dietary advice in patients with type 2 diabetes. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 106(6), 1394-1400. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.139626

Vancouver

Møller G, Andersen HK, Snorgaard O. A systematic review and meta-analysis of nutrition therapy compared with dietary advice in patients with type 2 diabetes. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2017;106(6):1394-1400. https://doi.org/10.3945/ajcn.116.139626

Author

Møller, Grith ; Andersen, Henning Keinke ; Snorgaard, Ole. / A systematic review and meta-analysis of nutrition therapy compared with dietary advice in patients with type 2 diabetes. I: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2017 ; Bind 106, Nr. 6. s. 1394-1400.

Bibtex

@article{4bb63ae3b52c462cb90c747cab5bdf26,
title = "A systematic review and meta-analysis of nutrition therapy compared with dietary advice in patients with type 2 diabetes",
abstract = "Background: Despite recommendations, many patients with type 2 diabetes receive dietary advice from nurses or doctors instead of individualized nutrition therapy (INT) that is provided by a dietitian.Objective: We performed a meta-analysis to compare the effect of INT that is provided by a registered dietitian with the effect of dietary advice that is provided by other healthcare professionals.Design: A systematic review was conducted of Cochrane library databases, EMBASE, CINAHL, and MEDLINE in the period 2004-2017 for guidelines, reviews, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed the outcomes glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), weight, body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2), and LDL cholesterol. Risk of bias and the quality of evidence were assessed according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation guidelines.Results: We identified 5 RCTs comprising 912 participants in total. In the first year of intervention (at 6 or 12 mo), nutrition therapy compared with dietary advice was followed by a 0.45{\%} (95{\%} CI: 0.36{\%}, 0.53{\%}) lower mean difference in HbA1c, a 0.55 (95{\%} CI: 0.02, 1.1) lower BMI, a 2.1-kg (95{\%} CI: 1.2-, 2.9-kg) lower weight, and a 0.17-mmol/L (95{\%} CI: 0.11-, 0.23-mmol/L) lower LDL cholesterol. No longer-term data were available. Some of the included studies had a potential bias, and therefore, the quality of the evidence was low or moderate. In addition, it was necessary to pool primary and secondary outcomes.Conclusions: INT that is provided by a dietitian compared with dietary advice that is provided by other health professionals leads to a greater effect on HbA1c, weight, and LDL cholesterol. Because of the potential bias, we recommend considering nutrition therapy that is provided by a dietitian as part of lifestyle intervention in type 2 diabetes, but further randomized studies are warranted.",
keywords = "Body Mass Index, Body Weight, Cholesterol, LDL, Counseling, Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2, Female, Glycated Hemoglobin A, Health Education, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Nurses, Nutrition Therapy, Nutritionists, Outcome Assessment (Health Care), Physicians, Comparative Study, Journal Article, Meta-Analysis, Review",
author = "Grith M{\o}ller and Andersen, {Henning Keinke} and Ole Snorgaard",
note = "CURIS 2017 NEXS 351",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.3945/ajcn.116.139626",
language = "English",
volume = "106",
pages = "1394--1400",
journal = "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A systematic review and meta-analysis of nutrition therapy compared with dietary advice in patients with type 2 diabetes

AU - Møller, Grith

AU - Andersen, Henning Keinke

AU - Snorgaard, Ole

N1 - CURIS 2017 NEXS 351

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Background: Despite recommendations, many patients with type 2 diabetes receive dietary advice from nurses or doctors instead of individualized nutrition therapy (INT) that is provided by a dietitian.Objective: We performed a meta-analysis to compare the effect of INT that is provided by a registered dietitian with the effect of dietary advice that is provided by other healthcare professionals.Design: A systematic review was conducted of Cochrane library databases, EMBASE, CINAHL, and MEDLINE in the period 2004-2017 for guidelines, reviews, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed the outcomes glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), weight, body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2), and LDL cholesterol. Risk of bias and the quality of evidence were assessed according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation guidelines.Results: We identified 5 RCTs comprising 912 participants in total. In the first year of intervention (at 6 or 12 mo), nutrition therapy compared with dietary advice was followed by a 0.45% (95% CI: 0.36%, 0.53%) lower mean difference in HbA1c, a 0.55 (95% CI: 0.02, 1.1) lower BMI, a 2.1-kg (95% CI: 1.2-, 2.9-kg) lower weight, and a 0.17-mmol/L (95% CI: 0.11-, 0.23-mmol/L) lower LDL cholesterol. No longer-term data were available. Some of the included studies had a potential bias, and therefore, the quality of the evidence was low or moderate. In addition, it was necessary to pool primary and secondary outcomes.Conclusions: INT that is provided by a dietitian compared with dietary advice that is provided by other health professionals leads to a greater effect on HbA1c, weight, and LDL cholesterol. Because of the potential bias, we recommend considering nutrition therapy that is provided by a dietitian as part of lifestyle intervention in type 2 diabetes, but further randomized studies are warranted.

AB - Background: Despite recommendations, many patients with type 2 diabetes receive dietary advice from nurses or doctors instead of individualized nutrition therapy (INT) that is provided by a dietitian.Objective: We performed a meta-analysis to compare the effect of INT that is provided by a registered dietitian with the effect of dietary advice that is provided by other healthcare professionals.Design: A systematic review was conducted of Cochrane library databases, EMBASE, CINAHL, and MEDLINE in the period 2004-2017 for guidelines, reviews, and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that assessed the outcomes glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), weight, body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2), and LDL cholesterol. Risk of bias and the quality of evidence were assessed according to the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation guidelines.Results: We identified 5 RCTs comprising 912 participants in total. In the first year of intervention (at 6 or 12 mo), nutrition therapy compared with dietary advice was followed by a 0.45% (95% CI: 0.36%, 0.53%) lower mean difference in HbA1c, a 0.55 (95% CI: 0.02, 1.1) lower BMI, a 2.1-kg (95% CI: 1.2-, 2.9-kg) lower weight, and a 0.17-mmol/L (95% CI: 0.11-, 0.23-mmol/L) lower LDL cholesterol. No longer-term data were available. Some of the included studies had a potential bias, and therefore, the quality of the evidence was low or moderate. In addition, it was necessary to pool primary and secondary outcomes.Conclusions: INT that is provided by a dietitian compared with dietary advice that is provided by other health professionals leads to a greater effect on HbA1c, weight, and LDL cholesterol. Because of the potential bias, we recommend considering nutrition therapy that is provided by a dietitian as part of lifestyle intervention in type 2 diabetes, but further randomized studies are warranted.

KW - Body Mass Index

KW - Body Weight

KW - Cholesterol, LDL

KW - Counseling

KW - Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2

KW - Female

KW - Glycated Hemoglobin A

KW - Health Education

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Nurses

KW - Nutrition Therapy

KW - Nutritionists

KW - Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

KW - Physicians

KW - Comparative Study

KW - Journal Article

KW - Meta-Analysis

KW - Review

U2 - 10.3945/ajcn.116.139626

DO - 10.3945/ajcn.116.139626

M3 - Review

VL - 106

SP - 1394

EP - 1400

JO - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 186713842