Plasma free fatty acid concentration is closely tied to whole-body peak fat oxidation rate during repeated exercise

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Standard

Plasma free fatty acid concentration is closely tied to whole-body peak fat oxidation rate during repeated exercise. / Frandsen, Jacob; Vest, Stine Dahl; Ritz, Christian; Larsen, Steen; Dela, Flemming; Helge, Jørn Wulff.

I: Journal of Applied Physiology, Bind 126, Nr. 6, 2019, s. 1563-1571.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Frandsen, J, Vest, SD, Ritz, C, Larsen, S, Dela, F & Helge, JW 2019, 'Plasma free fatty acid concentration is closely tied to whole-body peak fat oxidation rate during repeated exercise', Journal of Applied Physiology, bind 126, nr. 6, s. 1563-1571. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00995.2018

APA

Frandsen, J., Vest, S. D., Ritz, C., Larsen, S., Dela, F., & Helge, J. W. (2019). Plasma free fatty acid concentration is closely tied to whole-body peak fat oxidation rate during repeated exercise. Journal of Applied Physiology, 126(6), 1563-1571. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00995.2018

Vancouver

Frandsen J, Vest SD, Ritz C, Larsen S, Dela F, Helge JW. Plasma free fatty acid concentration is closely tied to whole-body peak fat oxidation rate during repeated exercise. Journal of Applied Physiology. 2019;126(6):1563-1571. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00995.2018

Author

Frandsen, Jacob ; Vest, Stine Dahl ; Ritz, Christian ; Larsen, Steen ; Dela, Flemming ; Helge, Jørn Wulff. / Plasma free fatty acid concentration is closely tied to whole-body peak fat oxidation rate during repeated exercise. I: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2019 ; Bind 126, Nr. 6. s. 1563-1571.

Bibtex

@article{35eb186671f24631826581f5d1bb8b4c,
title = "Plasma free fatty acid concentration is closely tied to whole-body peak fat oxidation rate during repeated exercise",
abstract = "Plasma free fatty acids (FFA) are a major contributor to whole body fat oxidation during exercise. However, to what extent, manipulating plasma FFA concentrations will influence whole body peak fat oxidation rate (PFO) during exercise remains elusive. In this study we aimed to increase plasma FFA concentrations through a combination of fasting and repeated exercise bouts. We hypothesized that an increase in plasma FFA concentration would increase peak fat oxidation rate in a dose dependent manner. 10 healthy young (31±6 years) (mean ± SD) well-trained (V̇O2max: 65.9±6.1 ml/min/kg) men performed 4 graded exercise tests (GXT) on one day. The GXT were interspersed by 4 hours of bedrest. This was conducted either in fasted state, or with the consumption of a standardized carbohydrate-rich meal 31/2 hours before each GXT. Fasting and previous GXT resulted in a gradual increase in PFO from 0.63±0.18g/min after an overnight fast (10 hours) to 0.93±0.17 g/min after app. 22 hours of fasting and three previous GTX. This increase in PFO coincided with an increase in plasma FFA concentrations (r2=0.73, p<0.0001). Ingestion of a carbohydrate-rich meal 31/2 hour before each GXT resulted in unaltered PFO rates. This was also reflected in unchanged plasma FFA, glucose and insulin concentrations. In this study we show that plasma FFA availability is closely tied to whole-body peak fat oxidation rate and that the length of fasting and previous exercise are strong stimuli towards increasing plasma FFA concentration, highlighting the importance for pre-exercise standardisation when conducting graded exercise tests measuring substrate oxidation.",
keywords = "The Faculty of Science, Fat oxidation rate, Fasting, Substrate availability, Fatmax",
author = "Jacob Frandsen and Vest, {Stine Dahl} and Christian Ritz and Steen Larsen and Flemming Dela and Helge, {J{\o}rn Wulff}",
note = "CURIS 2019 NEXS 191",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1152/japplphysiol.00995.2018",
language = "English",
volume = "126",
pages = "1563--1571",
journal = "Journal of Applied Physiology",
issn = "8750-7587",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "6",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Plasma free fatty acid concentration is closely tied to whole-body peak fat oxidation rate during repeated exercise

AU - Frandsen, Jacob

AU - Vest, Stine Dahl

AU - Ritz, Christian

AU - Larsen, Steen

AU - Dela, Flemming

AU - Helge, Jørn Wulff

N1 - CURIS 2019 NEXS 191

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Plasma free fatty acids (FFA) are a major contributor to whole body fat oxidation during exercise. However, to what extent, manipulating plasma FFA concentrations will influence whole body peak fat oxidation rate (PFO) during exercise remains elusive. In this study we aimed to increase plasma FFA concentrations through a combination of fasting and repeated exercise bouts. We hypothesized that an increase in plasma FFA concentration would increase peak fat oxidation rate in a dose dependent manner. 10 healthy young (31±6 years) (mean ± SD) well-trained (V̇O2max: 65.9±6.1 ml/min/kg) men performed 4 graded exercise tests (GXT) on one day. The GXT were interspersed by 4 hours of bedrest. This was conducted either in fasted state, or with the consumption of a standardized carbohydrate-rich meal 31/2 hours before each GXT. Fasting and previous GXT resulted in a gradual increase in PFO from 0.63±0.18g/min after an overnight fast (10 hours) to 0.93±0.17 g/min after app. 22 hours of fasting and three previous GTX. This increase in PFO coincided with an increase in plasma FFA concentrations (r2=0.73, p<0.0001). Ingestion of a carbohydrate-rich meal 31/2 hour before each GXT resulted in unaltered PFO rates. This was also reflected in unchanged plasma FFA, glucose and insulin concentrations. In this study we show that plasma FFA availability is closely tied to whole-body peak fat oxidation rate and that the length of fasting and previous exercise are strong stimuli towards increasing plasma FFA concentration, highlighting the importance for pre-exercise standardisation when conducting graded exercise tests measuring substrate oxidation.

AB - Plasma free fatty acids (FFA) are a major contributor to whole body fat oxidation during exercise. However, to what extent, manipulating plasma FFA concentrations will influence whole body peak fat oxidation rate (PFO) during exercise remains elusive. In this study we aimed to increase plasma FFA concentrations through a combination of fasting and repeated exercise bouts. We hypothesized that an increase in plasma FFA concentration would increase peak fat oxidation rate in a dose dependent manner. 10 healthy young (31±6 years) (mean ± SD) well-trained (V̇O2max: 65.9±6.1 ml/min/kg) men performed 4 graded exercise tests (GXT) on one day. The GXT were interspersed by 4 hours of bedrest. This was conducted either in fasted state, or with the consumption of a standardized carbohydrate-rich meal 31/2 hours before each GXT. Fasting and previous GXT resulted in a gradual increase in PFO from 0.63±0.18g/min after an overnight fast (10 hours) to 0.93±0.17 g/min after app. 22 hours of fasting and three previous GTX. This increase in PFO coincided with an increase in plasma FFA concentrations (r2=0.73, p<0.0001). Ingestion of a carbohydrate-rich meal 31/2 hour before each GXT resulted in unaltered PFO rates. This was also reflected in unchanged plasma FFA, glucose and insulin concentrations. In this study we show that plasma FFA availability is closely tied to whole-body peak fat oxidation rate and that the length of fasting and previous exercise are strong stimuli towards increasing plasma FFA concentration, highlighting the importance for pre-exercise standardisation when conducting graded exercise tests measuring substrate oxidation.

KW - The Faculty of Science

KW - Fat oxidation rate

KW - Fasting

KW - Substrate availability

KW - Fatmax

U2 - 10.1152/japplphysiol.00995.2018

DO - 10.1152/japplphysiol.00995.2018

M3 - Journal article

VL - 126

SP - 1563

EP - 1571

JO - Journal of Applied Physiology

JF - Journal of Applied Physiology

SN - 8750-7587

IS - 6

ER -

ID: 214683148