Motor skills and exercise capacity are associated with objective measures of cognitive functions and academic performance in preadolescent children

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Motor skills and exercise capacity are associated with objective measures of cognitive functions and academic performance in preadolescent children. / Geertsen, Svend Sparre; Thomas, Richard; Larsen, Malte Nejst; Dahn, Ida Marie; Andersen, Josefine Needham; Krause-Jensen, Matilde; Korup, Vibeke; Nielsen, Claus Malta; Wienecke, Jacob; Ritz, Christian; Krustrup, Peter; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper.

I: P L o S One, Bind 11, Nr. 8, e0161960, 2016.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Geertsen, SS, Thomas, R, Larsen, MN, Dahn, IM, Andersen, JN, Krause-Jensen, M, Korup, V, Nielsen, CM, Wienecke, J, Ritz, C, Krustrup, P & Lundbye-Jensen, J 2016, 'Motor skills and exercise capacity are associated with objective measures of cognitive functions and academic performance in preadolescent children', P L o S One, bind 11, nr. 8, e0161960. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0161960

APA

Geertsen, S. S., Thomas, R., Larsen, M. N., Dahn, I. M., Andersen, J. N., Krause-Jensen, M., ... Lundbye-Jensen, J. (2016). Motor skills and exercise capacity are associated with objective measures of cognitive functions and academic performance in preadolescent children. P L o S One, 11(8), [e0161960]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0161960

Vancouver

Geertsen SS, Thomas R, Larsen MN, Dahn IM, Andersen JN, Krause-Jensen M o.a. Motor skills and exercise capacity are associated with objective measures of cognitive functions and academic performance in preadolescent children. P L o S One. 2016;11(8). e0161960. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0161960

Author

Geertsen, Svend Sparre ; Thomas, Richard ; Larsen, Malte Nejst ; Dahn, Ida Marie ; Andersen, Josefine Needham ; Krause-Jensen, Matilde ; Korup, Vibeke ; Nielsen, Claus Malta ; Wienecke, Jacob ; Ritz, Christian ; Krustrup, Peter ; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper. / Motor skills and exercise capacity are associated with objective measures of cognitive functions and academic performance in preadolescent children. I: P L o S One. 2016 ; Bind 11, Nr. 8.

Bibtex

@article{6daf71e25ac541ad972e4585b0dd5391,
title = "Motor skills and exercise capacity are associated with objective measures of cognitive functions and academic performance in preadolescent children",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To investigate associations between motor skills, exercise capacity and cognitive functions, and evaluate how they correlate to academic performance in mathematics and reading comprehension using standardised, objective tests.METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 423 Danish children (age: 9.29±0.35 years, 209 girls). Fine and gross motor skills were evaluated in a visuomotor accuracy-tracking task, and a whole-body coordination task, respectively. Exercise capacity was estimated from the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 children's test (YYIR1C). Selected tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) were used to assess different domains of cognitive functions, including sustained attention, spatial working memory, episodic and semantic memory, and processing speed. Linear mixed-effects models were used to investigate associations between these measures and the relationship with standard tests of academic performance in mathematics and reading comprehension.RESULTS: Both fine and gross motor skills were associated with better performance in all five tested cognitive domains (all P<0.001), whereas exercise capacity was only associated with better sustained attention (P<0.046) and spatial working memory (P<0.038). Fine and gross motor skills (all P<0.001), exercise capacity and cognitive functions such as working memory, episodic memory, sustained attention and processing speed were all associated with better performance in mathematics and reading comprehension.CONCLUSIONS: The data demonstrate that fine and gross motor skills are positively correlated with several aspects of cognitive functions and with academic performance in both mathematics and reading comprehension. Moreover, exercise capacity was associated with academic performance and performance in some cognitive domains. Future interventions should investigate associations between changes in motor skills, exercise capacity, cognitive functions, and academic performance to elucidate the causality of these associations.",
author = "Geertsen, {Svend Sparre} and Richard Thomas and Larsen, {Malte Nejst} and Dahn, {Ida Marie} and Andersen, {Josefine Needham} and Matilde Krause-Jensen and Vibeke Korup and Nielsen, {Claus Malta} and Jacob Wienecke and Christian Ritz and Peter Krustrup and Jesper Lundbye-Jensen",
note = "CURIS 2016 NEXS 240",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0161960",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "P L o S One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "8",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Motor skills and exercise capacity are associated with objective measures of cognitive functions and academic performance in preadolescent children

AU - Geertsen, Svend Sparre

AU - Thomas, Richard

AU - Larsen, Malte Nejst

AU - Dahn, Ida Marie

AU - Andersen, Josefine Needham

AU - Krause-Jensen, Matilde

AU - Korup, Vibeke

AU - Nielsen, Claus Malta

AU - Wienecke, Jacob

AU - Ritz, Christian

AU - Krustrup, Peter

AU - Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper

N1 - CURIS 2016 NEXS 240

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate associations between motor skills, exercise capacity and cognitive functions, and evaluate how they correlate to academic performance in mathematics and reading comprehension using standardised, objective tests.METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 423 Danish children (age: 9.29±0.35 years, 209 girls). Fine and gross motor skills were evaluated in a visuomotor accuracy-tracking task, and a whole-body coordination task, respectively. Exercise capacity was estimated from the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 children's test (YYIR1C). Selected tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) were used to assess different domains of cognitive functions, including sustained attention, spatial working memory, episodic and semantic memory, and processing speed. Linear mixed-effects models were used to investigate associations between these measures and the relationship with standard tests of academic performance in mathematics and reading comprehension.RESULTS: Both fine and gross motor skills were associated with better performance in all five tested cognitive domains (all P<0.001), whereas exercise capacity was only associated with better sustained attention (P<0.046) and spatial working memory (P<0.038). Fine and gross motor skills (all P<0.001), exercise capacity and cognitive functions such as working memory, episodic memory, sustained attention and processing speed were all associated with better performance in mathematics and reading comprehension.CONCLUSIONS: The data demonstrate that fine and gross motor skills are positively correlated with several aspects of cognitive functions and with academic performance in both mathematics and reading comprehension. Moreover, exercise capacity was associated with academic performance and performance in some cognitive domains. Future interventions should investigate associations between changes in motor skills, exercise capacity, cognitive functions, and academic performance to elucidate the causality of these associations.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To investigate associations between motor skills, exercise capacity and cognitive functions, and evaluate how they correlate to academic performance in mathematics and reading comprehension using standardised, objective tests.METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 423 Danish children (age: 9.29±0.35 years, 209 girls). Fine and gross motor skills were evaluated in a visuomotor accuracy-tracking task, and a whole-body coordination task, respectively. Exercise capacity was estimated from the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 1 children's test (YYIR1C). Selected tests from the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) were used to assess different domains of cognitive functions, including sustained attention, spatial working memory, episodic and semantic memory, and processing speed. Linear mixed-effects models were used to investigate associations between these measures and the relationship with standard tests of academic performance in mathematics and reading comprehension.RESULTS: Both fine and gross motor skills were associated with better performance in all five tested cognitive domains (all P<0.001), whereas exercise capacity was only associated with better sustained attention (P<0.046) and spatial working memory (P<0.038). Fine and gross motor skills (all P<0.001), exercise capacity and cognitive functions such as working memory, episodic memory, sustained attention and processing speed were all associated with better performance in mathematics and reading comprehension.CONCLUSIONS: The data demonstrate that fine and gross motor skills are positively correlated with several aspects of cognitive functions and with academic performance in both mathematics and reading comprehension. Moreover, exercise capacity was associated with academic performance and performance in some cognitive domains. Future interventions should investigate associations between changes in motor skills, exercise capacity, cognitive functions, and academic performance to elucidate the causality of these associations.

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0161960

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0161960

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27560512

VL - 11

JO - P L o S One

JF - P L o S One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 8

M1 - e0161960

ER -

ID: 164894800