Determinants of DHA status and functional effects on metabolic markers and immune modulation in early life: Use of single nucleotide polymorphisms to support effects of n-3 LCPUFA

Publikation: Bog/antologi/afhandling/rapportPh.d.-afhandlingForskning

Laurine Bente Schram Harsløf

Optimal intake of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LCPUFA) during infancy and early childhood is not known and only a few studies have examined to what extend docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) status is affected by endogenous synthesis from α-linolenic acid relative to the influence of dietary intake and other potential determinants in infancy and childhood.

The first part of the PhD thesis describes several potential determinants of infant and young child DHA status including genetic variation in FADS, breastfeeding and fish intake. Results can be found in Paper 1.

Evidence for effects of n-3 LCPUFA on metabolic markers such as glucose homeostasis, lipid profile and blood pressure in young children is limited. No studies have explored whether polymorphisms of genes encoding proteins involved in the mechanisms behind the effect (such as PPARG2 and COX2) can support the findings of diet studies. Furthermore, the evidence for immuno-modulatory effects of n-3 LCPUFA in childhood remain inconclusive and inclusion of genotypes of genes involved in the mechanisms behind the effects of n-3 LCPUFA (such as PPARG2, COX2 and NFKB1) may support the findings and provide evidence of possible mechanisms of action by identifying the involved pathways and genes.

The second part of the PhD thesis explores whether functional effects of n-3 LCPUFA on metabolic markers and immune maturation in young children can be supported by polymorphisms in genes involved in the mechanisms (PPARG2, COX2 and NFKB1). Results can be found in Paper 2 and 3.
OriginalsprogEngelsk
ForlagDepartment of Nutrition, Exercise and Sports, Faculty of Science, University of Copenhagen
StatusUdgivet - 2014

Bibliografisk note

CURIS 2014 NEXS 390

ID: 111043552