Bariatric surgery does not affect food preferences, but individual changes in food preferences may predict weight loss

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Standard

Bariatric surgery does not affect food preferences, but individual changes in food preferences may predict weight loss. / Nielsen, Mette Søndergaard; Rasmussen, Simone; Christensen, Bodil Just; Ritz, Christian; le Roux, Carel W; Schmidt, Julie Berg; Sjödin, Anders Mikael.

I: Obesity, Bind 26, Nr. 12, 2018, s. 1879-1887.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Nielsen, MS, Rasmussen, S, Christensen, BJ, Ritz, C, le Roux, CW, Schmidt, JB & Sjödin, AM 2018, 'Bariatric surgery does not affect food preferences, but individual changes in food preferences may predict weight loss', Obesity, bind 26, nr. 12, s. 1879-1887. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.22272

APA

Nielsen, M. S., Rasmussen, S., Christensen, B. J., Ritz, C., le Roux, C. W., Schmidt, J. B., & Sjödin, A. M. (2018). Bariatric surgery does not affect food preferences, but individual changes in food preferences may predict weight loss. Obesity, 26(12), 1879-1887. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.22272

Vancouver

Nielsen MS, Rasmussen S, Christensen BJ, Ritz C, le Roux CW, Schmidt JB o.a. Bariatric surgery does not affect food preferences, but individual changes in food preferences may predict weight loss. Obesity. 2018;26(12):1879-1887. https://doi.org/10.1002/oby.22272

Author

Nielsen, Mette Søndergaard ; Rasmussen, Simone ; Christensen, Bodil Just ; Ritz, Christian ; le Roux, Carel W ; Schmidt, Julie Berg ; Sjödin, Anders Mikael. / Bariatric surgery does not affect food preferences, but individual changes in food preferences may predict weight loss. I: Obesity. 2018 ; Bind 26, Nr. 12. s. 1879-1887.

Bibtex

@article{36e7da7beee34a7394344a4ab2797a0b,
title = "Bariatric surgery does not affect food preferences, but individual changes in food preferences may predict weight loss",
abstract = "Objective: Using an ad libitum buffet meal targeting direct behavior, the authors of the current study previously reported no effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG) surgery on food preferences 6 months after surgery. The current study investigated changes in food preferences at 18 months after surgery and whether changes in food preferences at 6 months predicted weight loss.Methods: Twenty food items separated into the following food categories were served at the buffet meal: high-fat, low-fat, sweet, savory, high-fat savory, high-fat sweet, low-fat savory, and low-fat sweet. Energy intake and intake from each of the food items were registered. Energy intake prior to the meal was standardized.Results: Thirty-nine subjects completed visits before surgery and 18 months following RYGB (n = 29) and SG (n = 10) surgery. Energy intake decreased 41{\%} (4,470 ± 209 kJ vs. 2,618 ± 209 kJ, P < 0.001), but no change occurred in relative energy intake from any of the food categories (all P ≥ 0.23), energy density (P = 0.20), or macronutrient intake (all P ≥ 0.28). However, changes in high-fat food intake, protein intake, energy intake, and energy density at 6 months predicted weight loss at 18 months (P ≤ 0.02).Coclusions: RYGB surgery and SG surgery do not affect food preferences. However, changes in food preferences seem to be predictive of weight loss.",
author = "Nielsen, {Mette S{\o}ndergaard} and Simone Rasmussen and Christensen, {Bodil Just} and Christian Ritz and {le Roux}, {Carel W} and Schmidt, {Julie Berg} and Sj{\"o}din, {Anders Mikael}",
note = "CURIS 2018 NEXS 385",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1002/oby.22272",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "1879--1887",
journal = "Obesity",
issn = "1930-7381",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bariatric surgery does not affect food preferences, but individual changes in food preferences may predict weight loss

AU - Nielsen, Mette Søndergaard

AU - Rasmussen, Simone

AU - Christensen, Bodil Just

AU - Ritz, Christian

AU - le Roux, Carel W

AU - Schmidt, Julie Berg

AU - Sjödin, Anders Mikael

N1 - CURIS 2018 NEXS 385

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Objective: Using an ad libitum buffet meal targeting direct behavior, the authors of the current study previously reported no effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG) surgery on food preferences 6 months after surgery. The current study investigated changes in food preferences at 18 months after surgery and whether changes in food preferences at 6 months predicted weight loss.Methods: Twenty food items separated into the following food categories were served at the buffet meal: high-fat, low-fat, sweet, savory, high-fat savory, high-fat sweet, low-fat savory, and low-fat sweet. Energy intake and intake from each of the food items were registered. Energy intake prior to the meal was standardized.Results: Thirty-nine subjects completed visits before surgery and 18 months following RYGB (n = 29) and SG (n = 10) surgery. Energy intake decreased 41% (4,470 ± 209 kJ vs. 2,618 ± 209 kJ, P < 0.001), but no change occurred in relative energy intake from any of the food categories (all P ≥ 0.23), energy density (P = 0.20), or macronutrient intake (all P ≥ 0.28). However, changes in high-fat food intake, protein intake, energy intake, and energy density at 6 months predicted weight loss at 18 months (P ≤ 0.02).Coclusions: RYGB surgery and SG surgery do not affect food preferences. However, changes in food preferences seem to be predictive of weight loss.

AB - Objective: Using an ad libitum buffet meal targeting direct behavior, the authors of the current study previously reported no effect of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (SG) surgery on food preferences 6 months after surgery. The current study investigated changes in food preferences at 18 months after surgery and whether changes in food preferences at 6 months predicted weight loss.Methods: Twenty food items separated into the following food categories were served at the buffet meal: high-fat, low-fat, sweet, savory, high-fat savory, high-fat sweet, low-fat savory, and low-fat sweet. Energy intake and intake from each of the food items were registered. Energy intake prior to the meal was standardized.Results: Thirty-nine subjects completed visits before surgery and 18 months following RYGB (n = 29) and SG (n = 10) surgery. Energy intake decreased 41% (4,470 ± 209 kJ vs. 2,618 ± 209 kJ, P < 0.001), but no change occurred in relative energy intake from any of the food categories (all P ≥ 0.23), energy density (P = 0.20), or macronutrient intake (all P ≥ 0.28). However, changes in high-fat food intake, protein intake, energy intake, and energy density at 6 months predicted weight loss at 18 months (P ≤ 0.02).Coclusions: RYGB surgery and SG surgery do not affect food preferences. However, changes in food preferences seem to be predictive of weight loss.

U2 - 10.1002/oby.22272

DO - 10.1002/oby.22272

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30421858

VL - 26

SP - 1879

EP - 1887

JO - Obesity

JF - Obesity

SN - 1930-7381

IS - 12

ER -

ID: 209051438