The effects of eating marine- or vegetable-fed farmed trout on the human plasma proteome profiles of healthy men

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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The effects of eating marine- or vegetable-fed farmed trout on the human plasma proteome profiles of healthy men. / Rentsch, Maria L; Lametsch, René; Bügel, Susanne Gjedsted; Jessen, Flemming; Lauritzen, Lotte.

In: British Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 113, No. 4, 2015, p. 699-707.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Rentsch, ML, Lametsch, R, Bügel, SG, Jessen, F & Lauritzen, L 2015, 'The effects of eating marine- or vegetable-fed farmed trout on the human plasma proteome profiles of healthy men', British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 113, no. 4, pp. 699-707. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114514004152

APA

Rentsch, M. L., Lametsch, R., Bügel, S. G., Jessen, F., & Lauritzen, L. (2015). The effects of eating marine- or vegetable-fed farmed trout on the human plasma proteome profiles of healthy men. British Journal of Nutrition, 113(4), 699-707. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114514004152

Vancouver

Rentsch ML, Lametsch R, Bügel SG, Jessen F, Lauritzen L. The effects of eating marine- or vegetable-fed farmed trout on the human plasma proteome profiles of healthy men. British Journal of Nutrition. 2015;113(4):699-707. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114514004152

Author

Rentsch, Maria L ; Lametsch, René ; Bügel, Susanne Gjedsted ; Jessen, Flemming ; Lauritzen, Lotte. / The effects of eating marine- or vegetable-fed farmed trout on the human plasma proteome profiles of healthy men. In: British Journal of Nutrition. 2015 ; Vol. 113, No. 4. pp. 699-707.

Bibtex

@article{a12b649e284146dbaf2738d74ad9c44b,
title = "The effects of eating marine- or vegetable-fed farmed trout on the human plasma proteome profiles of healthy men",
abstract = "Most human intervention studies have examined the effects on a subset of risk factors, some of which may require long-term exposure. The plasma proteome may reflect the underlying changes in protein expression and activation, and this could be used to identify early risk markers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of regular fish intake on the plasma proteome. We recruited thirty healthy men aged 40 to 70 years, who were randomly allocated to a daily meal of chicken or trout raised on vegetable or marine feeds. Blood samples were collected before and after 8 weeks of intervention, and after the removal of the twelve most abundant proteins, plasma proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein spots <66 a kda pi with>4·3 visualised by silver staining were matched by two-dimensional imaging software. Within-subject changes in spots were compared between the treatment groups. Differentially affected spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight/time of flight MS and the human Swiss-Prot database. We found 23/681 abundant plasma protein spots, which were up- or down-regulated by the dietary treatment (P< 0·05, q< 0·30), and eighteen of these were identified. In each trout group, ten spots differed from those in subjects given the chicken meal, but only three of these were common, and only one spot differed between the two trout groups. In both groups, the affected plasma proteins were involved in biological processes such as regulation of vitamin A and haem transport, blood fibrinolysis and oxidative defence. Thus, regular fish intake affects the plasma proteome, and the changes may indicate novel mechanisms of effect.",
author = "Rentsch, {Maria L} and Ren{\'e} Lametsch and B{\"u}gel, {Susanne Gjedsted} and Flemming Jessen and Lotte Lauritzen",
note = "CURIS 2015 NEXS 059",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1017/S0007114514004152",
language = "English",
volume = "113",
pages = "699--707",
journal = "British Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "0007-1145",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of eating marine- or vegetable-fed farmed trout on the human plasma proteome profiles of healthy men

AU - Rentsch, Maria L

AU - Lametsch, René

AU - Bügel, Susanne Gjedsted

AU - Jessen, Flemming

AU - Lauritzen, Lotte

N1 - CURIS 2015 NEXS 059

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Most human intervention studies have examined the effects on a subset of risk factors, some of which may require long-term exposure. The plasma proteome may reflect the underlying changes in protein expression and activation, and this could be used to identify early risk markers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of regular fish intake on the plasma proteome. We recruited thirty healthy men aged 40 to 70 years, who were randomly allocated to a daily meal of chicken or trout raised on vegetable or marine feeds. Blood samples were collected before and after 8 weeks of intervention, and after the removal of the twelve most abundant proteins, plasma proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein spots <66 a kda pi with>4·3 visualised by silver staining were matched by two-dimensional imaging software. Within-subject changes in spots were compared between the treatment groups. Differentially affected spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight/time of flight MS and the human Swiss-Prot database. We found 23/681 abundant plasma protein spots, which were up- or down-regulated by the dietary treatment (P< 0·05, q< 0·30), and eighteen of these were identified. In each trout group, ten spots differed from those in subjects given the chicken meal, but only three of these were common, and only one spot differed between the two trout groups. In both groups, the affected plasma proteins were involved in biological processes such as regulation of vitamin A and haem transport, blood fibrinolysis and oxidative defence. Thus, regular fish intake affects the plasma proteome, and the changes may indicate novel mechanisms of effect.

AB - Most human intervention studies have examined the effects on a subset of risk factors, some of which may require long-term exposure. The plasma proteome may reflect the underlying changes in protein expression and activation, and this could be used to identify early risk markers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of regular fish intake on the plasma proteome. We recruited thirty healthy men aged 40 to 70 years, who were randomly allocated to a daily meal of chicken or trout raised on vegetable or marine feeds. Blood samples were collected before and after 8 weeks of intervention, and after the removal of the twelve most abundant proteins, plasma proteins were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Protein spots <66 a kda pi with>4·3 visualised by silver staining were matched by two-dimensional imaging software. Within-subject changes in spots were compared between the treatment groups. Differentially affected spots were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight/time of flight MS and the human Swiss-Prot database. We found 23/681 abundant plasma protein spots, which were up- or down-regulated by the dietary treatment (P< 0·05, q< 0·30), and eighteen of these were identified. In each trout group, ten spots differed from those in subjects given the chicken meal, but only three of these were common, and only one spot differed between the two trout groups. In both groups, the affected plasma proteins were involved in biological processes such as regulation of vitamin A and haem transport, blood fibrinolysis and oxidative defence. Thus, regular fish intake affects the plasma proteome, and the changes may indicate novel mechanisms of effect.

U2 - 10.1017/S0007114514004152

DO - 10.1017/S0007114514004152

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 25622825

VL - 113

SP - 699

EP - 707

JO - British Journal of Nutrition

JF - British Journal of Nutrition

SN - 0007-1145

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 131165719