Short-term effects of dietary advanced glycation end products in rats

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Short-term effects of dietary advanced glycation end products in rats. / Poulsen, Malene Wibe; Andersen, Jeanette Marker; Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg; Madsen, Andreas Nygaard; Krath, Britta Naimi; Monosik, Rastislav; Bak, Monika Judyta; Nielsen, John; Holst, Birgitte; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt; Larsen, Lesli Hingstrup; Dragsted, Lars Ove.

In: British Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 115, No. 4, 2016, p. 629-636.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Poulsen, MW, Andersen, JM, Hedegaard, RSV, Madsen, AN, Krath, BN, Monosik, R, Bak, MJ, Nielsen, J, Holst, B, Skibsted, LH, Larsen, LH & Dragsted, LO 2016, 'Short-term effects of dietary advanced glycation end products in rats', British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 115, no. 4, pp. 629-636. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114515004833

APA

Poulsen, M. W., Andersen, J. M., Hedegaard, R. S. V., Madsen, A. N., Krath, B. N., Monosik, R., ... Dragsted, L. O. (2016). Short-term effects of dietary advanced glycation end products in rats. British Journal of Nutrition, 115(4), 629-636. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114515004833

Vancouver

Poulsen MW, Andersen JM, Hedegaard RSV, Madsen AN, Krath BN, Monosik R et al. Short-term effects of dietary advanced glycation end products in rats. British Journal of Nutrition. 2016;115(4):629-636. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114515004833

Author

Poulsen, Malene Wibe ; Andersen, Jeanette Marker ; Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg ; Madsen, Andreas Nygaard ; Krath, Britta Naimi ; Monosik, Rastislav ; Bak, Monika Judyta ; Nielsen, John ; Holst, Birgitte ; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt ; Larsen, Lesli Hingstrup ; Dragsted, Lars Ove. / Short-term effects of dietary advanced glycation end products in rats. In: British Journal of Nutrition. 2016 ; Vol. 115, No. 4. pp. 629-636.

Bibtex

@article{5f548ed212b5465e86b01f658108c9bd,
title = "Short-term effects of dietary advanced glycation end products in rats",
abstract = "Dietary advanced glycation end products (AGE) formed during heating of food have gained interest as potential nutritional toxins with adverse effects on inflammation and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we investigated the short-term effects of high and low molecular weight (HMW and LMW) dietary AGE on insulin sensitivity, expression of the receptor for AGE (RAGE), the AGE receptor 1 (AGER1) and TNF-α, F2-isoprostaglandins, body composition and food intake. For 2 weeks, thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a diet containing 20 {\%} milk powder with different proportions of this being given as heated milk powder (0, 40 or 100 {\%}), either native (HMW) or hydrolysed (LMW). Gene expression of RAGE and AGER1 in whole blood increased in the group receiving a high AGE LMW diet, which also had the highest urinary excretion of the AGE, methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 (MG-H1). Urinary excretion of N ε -carboxymethyl-lysine increased with increasing proportion of heat-treated milk powder in the HMW and LMW diets but was unrelated to gene expression. There was no difference in insulin sensitivity, F2-isoprostaglandins, food intake, water intake, body weight or body composition between the groups. In conclusion, RAGE and AGER1 expression can be influenced by a high AGE diet after only 2 weeks in proportion to MG-H1 excretion. No other short-term effects were observed.",
author = "Poulsen, {Malene Wibe} and Andersen, {Jeanette Marker} and Hedegaard, {Rikke Susanne Vingborg} and Madsen, {Andreas Nygaard} and Krath, {Britta Naimi} and Rastislav Monosik and Bak, {Monika Judyta} and John Nielsen and Birgitte Holst and Skibsted, {Leif Horsfelt} and Larsen, {Lesli Hingstrup} and Dragsted, {Lars Ove}",
note = "CURIS 2016 NEXS 046",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1017/S0007114515004833",
language = "English",
volume = "115",
pages = "629--636",
journal = "British Journal of Nutrition",
issn = "0007-1145",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Short-term effects of dietary advanced glycation end products in rats

AU - Poulsen, Malene Wibe

AU - Andersen, Jeanette Marker

AU - Hedegaard, Rikke Susanne Vingborg

AU - Madsen, Andreas Nygaard

AU - Krath, Britta Naimi

AU - Monosik, Rastislav

AU - Bak, Monika Judyta

AU - Nielsen, John

AU - Holst, Birgitte

AU - Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

AU - Larsen, Lesli Hingstrup

AU - Dragsted, Lars Ove

N1 - CURIS 2016 NEXS 046

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - Dietary advanced glycation end products (AGE) formed during heating of food have gained interest as potential nutritional toxins with adverse effects on inflammation and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we investigated the short-term effects of high and low molecular weight (HMW and LMW) dietary AGE on insulin sensitivity, expression of the receptor for AGE (RAGE), the AGE receptor 1 (AGER1) and TNF-α, F2-isoprostaglandins, body composition and food intake. For 2 weeks, thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a diet containing 20 % milk powder with different proportions of this being given as heated milk powder (0, 40 or 100 %), either native (HMW) or hydrolysed (LMW). Gene expression of RAGE and AGER1 in whole blood increased in the group receiving a high AGE LMW diet, which also had the highest urinary excretion of the AGE, methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 (MG-H1). Urinary excretion of N ε -carboxymethyl-lysine increased with increasing proportion of heat-treated milk powder in the HMW and LMW diets but was unrelated to gene expression. There was no difference in insulin sensitivity, F2-isoprostaglandins, food intake, water intake, body weight or body composition between the groups. In conclusion, RAGE and AGER1 expression can be influenced by a high AGE diet after only 2 weeks in proportion to MG-H1 excretion. No other short-term effects were observed.

AB - Dietary advanced glycation end products (AGE) formed during heating of food have gained interest as potential nutritional toxins with adverse effects on inflammation and glucose metabolism. In the present study, we investigated the short-term effects of high and low molecular weight (HMW and LMW) dietary AGE on insulin sensitivity, expression of the receptor for AGE (RAGE), the AGE receptor 1 (AGER1) and TNF-α, F2-isoprostaglandins, body composition and food intake. For 2 weeks, thirty-six Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a diet containing 20 % milk powder with different proportions of this being given as heated milk powder (0, 40 or 100 %), either native (HMW) or hydrolysed (LMW). Gene expression of RAGE and AGER1 in whole blood increased in the group receiving a high AGE LMW diet, which also had the highest urinary excretion of the AGE, methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone 1 (MG-H1). Urinary excretion of N ε -carboxymethyl-lysine increased with increasing proportion of heat-treated milk powder in the HMW and LMW diets but was unrelated to gene expression. There was no difference in insulin sensitivity, F2-isoprostaglandins, food intake, water intake, body weight or body composition between the groups. In conclusion, RAGE and AGER1 expression can be influenced by a high AGE diet after only 2 weeks in proportion to MG-H1 excretion. No other short-term effects were observed.

U2 - 10.1017/S0007114515004833

DO - 10.1017/S0007114515004833

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 26824730

VL - 115

SP - 629

EP - 636

JO - British Journal of Nutrition

JF - British Journal of Nutrition

SN - 0007-1145

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 154362236