European Communion and Planetary Organic Crisis

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

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European Communion and Planetary Organic Crisis. / Manners, Ian James.

Theorising the Crises of the European Union. ed. / Nathalie Brack; Seda Gurkan. Routledge, 2021. p. 159-182.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook chapterResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Manners, IJ 2021, European Communion and Planetary Organic Crisis. in N Brack & S Gurkan (eds), Theorising the Crises of the European Union. Routledge, pp. 159-182.

APA

Manners, I. J. (2021). European Communion and Planetary Organic Crisis. In N. Brack, & S. Gurkan (Eds.), Theorising the Crises of the European Union (pp. 159-182). Routledge.

Vancouver

Manners IJ. European Communion and Planetary Organic Crisis. In Brack N, Gurkan S, editors, Theorising the Crises of the European Union. Routledge. 2021. p. 159-182

Author

Manners, Ian James. / European Communion and Planetary Organic Crisis. Theorising the Crises of the European Union. editor / Nathalie Brack ; Seda Gurkan. Routledge, 2021. pp. 159-182

Bibtex

@inbook{754e8ced78a949b2a1f2f5f7af2864eb,
title = "European Communion and Planetary Organic Crisis",
abstract = "The most common way of theorising the European Union’s crises is to see them as, at best, a run of ‘bad luck’, or at worst as ‘multiple challenges’. This chapter brings two very different perspectives to the study of the European Union (EU) and its crises by theorising European (dis)integration using the Critical Social Theory (CST) of ‘European communion’ (Manners, 2013a) within the context of ‘planetary organic crisis’ (Gill and Benatar, 2020). These perspectives mark a radical break from ‘classical integration theories’ in using CST; from viewing the crises as distinct from each other; and from seeing the crises as particular to the EU. The rest of this section sets out the main arguments for a European communion theory of planetary organic crisis. The following five sections focus on European communion in the context of the neoliberal economic, demographic social, climatic ecological, proxy conflict, and ethno-nationalist political crises of the 21st century. The final section concludes on making sense of European communion and planetary organic crisis",
keywords = "Faculty of Social Sciences, European communion, European Union, European integration, planetary organic crisis, planetary politics",
author = "Manners, {Ian James}",
year = "2021",
month = "1",
day = "1",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-0-367-43140-2",
pages = "159--182",
editor = "Nathalie Brack and Seda Gurkan",
booktitle = "Theorising the Crises of the European Union",
publisher = "Routledge",
address = "United Kingdom",

}

RIS

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T1 - European Communion and Planetary Organic Crisis

AU - Manners, Ian James

PY - 2021/1/1

Y1 - 2021/1/1

N2 - The most common way of theorising the European Union’s crises is to see them as, at best, a run of ‘bad luck’, or at worst as ‘multiple challenges’. This chapter brings two very different perspectives to the study of the European Union (EU) and its crises by theorising European (dis)integration using the Critical Social Theory (CST) of ‘European communion’ (Manners, 2013a) within the context of ‘planetary organic crisis’ (Gill and Benatar, 2020). These perspectives mark a radical break from ‘classical integration theories’ in using CST; from viewing the crises as distinct from each other; and from seeing the crises as particular to the EU. The rest of this section sets out the main arguments for a European communion theory of planetary organic crisis. The following five sections focus on European communion in the context of the neoliberal economic, demographic social, climatic ecological, proxy conflict, and ethno-nationalist political crises of the 21st century. The final section concludes on making sense of European communion and planetary organic crisis

AB - The most common way of theorising the European Union’s crises is to see them as, at best, a run of ‘bad luck’, or at worst as ‘multiple challenges’. This chapter brings two very different perspectives to the study of the European Union (EU) and its crises by theorising European (dis)integration using the Critical Social Theory (CST) of ‘European communion’ (Manners, 2013a) within the context of ‘planetary organic crisis’ (Gill and Benatar, 2020). These perspectives mark a radical break from ‘classical integration theories’ in using CST; from viewing the crises as distinct from each other; and from seeing the crises as particular to the EU. The rest of this section sets out the main arguments for a European communion theory of planetary organic crisis. The following five sections focus on European communion in the context of the neoliberal economic, demographic social, climatic ecological, proxy conflict, and ethno-nationalist political crises of the 21st century. The final section concludes on making sense of European communion and planetary organic crisis

KW - Faculty of Social Sciences

KW - European communion

KW - European Union

KW - European integration

KW - planetary organic crisis

KW - planetary politics

UR - https://www.taylorfrancis.com/chapters/european-communion-planetary-organic-crisis-ian-manners/e/10.4324/9781003001423-9

M3 - Book chapter

SN - 978-0-367-43140-2

SP - 159

EP - 182

BT - Theorising the Crises of the European Union

A2 - Brack, Nathalie

A2 - Gurkan, Seda

PB - Routledge

ER -

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