Down to the River: Identity, Citizenship, Security, Borders and Water at the occupied Golan Heights

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Down to the River : Identity, Citizenship, Security, Borders and Water at the occupied Golan Heights. / Wessels, Josepha Ivanka.

In: Middle East Critique, Vol. 24, No. 3, 29.07.2015, p. 269-287.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Wessels, JI 2015, 'Down to the River: Identity, Citizenship, Security, Borders and Water at the occupied Golan Heights', Middle East Critique, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 269-287. https://doi.org/10.1080/19436149.2015.1046709

APA

Wessels, J. I. (2015). Down to the River: Identity, Citizenship, Security, Borders and Water at the occupied Golan Heights. Middle East Critique, 24(3), 269-287. https://doi.org/10.1080/19436149.2015.1046709

Vancouver

Wessels JI. Down to the River: Identity, Citizenship, Security, Borders and Water at the occupied Golan Heights. Middle East Critique. 2015 Jul 29;24(3):269-287. https://doi.org/10.1080/19436149.2015.1046709

Author

Wessels, Josepha Ivanka. / Down to the River : Identity, Citizenship, Security, Borders and Water at the occupied Golan Heights. In: Middle East Critique. 2015 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 269-287.

Bibtex

@article{72cab6a8cded4107b76f147d6446e1d4,
title = "Down to the River: Identity, Citizenship, Security, Borders and Water at the occupied Golan Heights",
abstract = "Currently there is no coherent or sustainable water cooperation among the five states—Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestinian territories and Syria—that share the Jordan River. Why do people not cooperate on sustainable river basin management, even if it seems the most rational course from the perspective of economic benefits? I hypothesize that the political uses of citizenship, identity and security at the local level hamper cooperation at the basin level and ignore cognitive dimensions of violence and conflict. In this article, I have chosen the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights as a case study to illustrate hydropolitics in praxis, because the political future of this particular area in many respects affects the sustainable future of the Jordan River Basin and the entire Levant.",
keywords = "Faculty of Social Sciences, Syria , Water governance, Security, Citizenship, Cognitive Theory, Golan, hydro-politics, Identity, Israel, Rational choice, Faculty of Humanities, Syria, Israel, Cognitive Theory, Security, Identity, Water",
author = "Wessels, {Josepha Ivanka}",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
day = "29",
doi = "10.1080/19436149.2015.1046709",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "269--287",
journal = "Middle East Critique",
issn = "1943-6149",
publisher = "Routledge",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Down to the River

T2 - Identity, Citizenship, Security, Borders and Water at the occupied Golan Heights

AU - Wessels, Josepha Ivanka

PY - 2015/7/29

Y1 - 2015/7/29

N2 - Currently there is no coherent or sustainable water cooperation among the five states—Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestinian territories and Syria—that share the Jordan River. Why do people not cooperate on sustainable river basin management, even if it seems the most rational course from the perspective of economic benefits? I hypothesize that the political uses of citizenship, identity and security at the local level hamper cooperation at the basin level and ignore cognitive dimensions of violence and conflict. In this article, I have chosen the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights as a case study to illustrate hydropolitics in praxis, because the political future of this particular area in many respects affects the sustainable future of the Jordan River Basin and the entire Levant.

AB - Currently there is no coherent or sustainable water cooperation among the five states—Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestinian territories and Syria—that share the Jordan River. Why do people not cooperate on sustainable river basin management, even if it seems the most rational course from the perspective of economic benefits? I hypothesize that the political uses of citizenship, identity and security at the local level hamper cooperation at the basin level and ignore cognitive dimensions of violence and conflict. In this article, I have chosen the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights as a case study to illustrate hydropolitics in praxis, because the political future of this particular area in many respects affects the sustainable future of the Jordan River Basin and the entire Levant.

KW - Faculty of Social Sciences

KW - Syria

KW - Water governance

KW - Security

KW - Citizenship

KW - Cognitive Theory

KW - Golan

KW - hydro-politics

KW - Identity

KW - Israel

KW - Rational choice

KW - Faculty of Humanities

KW - Syria

KW - Israel

KW - Cognitive Theory

KW - Security

KW - Identity

KW - Water

U2 - 10.1080/19436149.2015.1046709

DO - 10.1080/19436149.2015.1046709

M3 - Journal article

VL - 24

SP - 269

EP - 287

JO - Middle East Critique

JF - Middle East Critique

SN - 1943-6149

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 149085835