Dietary supplementation with flaxseed mucilage alone or in combination with calcium in dogs: effects on apparent digestibility of fat and energy and fecal characteristics

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Standard

Dietary supplementation with flaxseed mucilage alone or in combination with calcium in dogs : effects on apparent digestibility of fat and energy and fecal characteristics. / Nybroe, S; Astrup, Arne; Bjørnvad, Charlotte Reinhard.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 40, No. 12, 2016, p. 1884-1890.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Nybroe, S, Astrup, A & Bjørnvad, CR 2016, 'Dietary supplementation with flaxseed mucilage alone or in combination with calcium in dogs: effects on apparent digestibility of fat and energy and fecal characteristics', International Journal of Obesity, vol. 40, no. 12, pp. 1884-1890. https://doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2016.139

APA

Nybroe, S., Astrup, A., & Bjørnvad, C. R. (2016). Dietary supplementation with flaxseed mucilage alone or in combination with calcium in dogs: effects on apparent digestibility of fat and energy and fecal characteristics. International Journal of Obesity, 40(12), 1884-1890. https://doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2016.139

Vancouver

Nybroe S, Astrup A, Bjørnvad CR. Dietary supplementation with flaxseed mucilage alone or in combination with calcium in dogs: effects on apparent digestibility of fat and energy and fecal characteristics. International Journal of Obesity. 2016;40(12):1884-1890. https://doi.org/10.1038/ijo.2016.139

Author

Nybroe, S ; Astrup, Arne ; Bjørnvad, Charlotte Reinhard. / Dietary supplementation with flaxseed mucilage alone or in combination with calcium in dogs : effects on apparent digestibility of fat and energy and fecal characteristics. In: International Journal of Obesity. 2016 ; Vol. 40, No. 12. pp. 1884-1890.

Bibtex

@article{b8b1312d63454d7bbdedd8849978c1c8,
title = "Dietary supplementation with flaxseed mucilage alone or in combination with calcium in dogs: effects on apparent digestibility of fat and energy and fecal characteristics",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: In humans, dietary supplementation with flaxseed mucilage and calcium decrease apparent digestibility of fat and energy. These supplements could prove useful for weight management in dogs.OBJECTIVE: To examine dry matter, energy and fat apparent digestibility, and fecal characteristics following dietary flaxseed mucilage supplementation alone or in combination with calcium.METHODS: A single-blinded crossover feeding trial was conducted on 11 privately owned dogs. During three consecutive 14-day periods, dogs where fed commercial dog food supplemented with potato starch (control diet), flaxseed mucilage or flaxseed mucilage and calcium. Feces from the past 2 days of each period were collected for analysis. Owners recorded fecal score (1-7: 1=very hard/dry feces, 2-3=ideal and 7=diarrhea).RESULTS: Apparent digestibility of fat was lower in both flaxseed mucilage diet (94.5±0.8{\%}), and flaxseed mucilage and calcium diet (92.9±0.9{\%}) compared with control diet (96.9±0.2{\%}, P<0.0001) with fat digestibility in flaxseed mucilage and calcium diet being significantly lower than the diet supplemented with only flaxseed mucilage. Dry matter and energy digestibility was not significantly affected by diet. Fecal wet weight, dry weight and dry matter percentage was not affected by diet despite a higher fecal score for test diets (3.7±0.3) compared with control (2.8±0.2, P<0.007).CONCLUSION: In dogs, flaxseed mucilage decreased fat apparent digestibility and this effect was enhanced when combined with calcium. Dry matter and energy apparent digestibility was not affected. Decreased fecal quality may limit the acceptable level of supplementation. Further studies on incorporating flaxseed mucilage in pet food products for weight management are needed.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 13 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ijo.2016.139.",
author = "S Nybroe and Arne Astrup and Bj{\o}rnvad, {Charlotte Reinhard}",
note = "CURIS 2016 NEXS 279",
year = "2016",
doi = "10.1038/ijo.2016.139",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "1884--1890",
journal = "International Journal of Obesity",
issn = "0307-0565",
publisher = "nature publishing group",
number = "12",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Dietary supplementation with flaxseed mucilage alone or in combination with calcium in dogs

T2 - effects on apparent digestibility of fat and energy and fecal characteristics

AU - Nybroe, S

AU - Astrup, Arne

AU - Bjørnvad, Charlotte Reinhard

N1 - CURIS 2016 NEXS 279

PY - 2016

Y1 - 2016

N2 - BACKGROUND: In humans, dietary supplementation with flaxseed mucilage and calcium decrease apparent digestibility of fat and energy. These supplements could prove useful for weight management in dogs.OBJECTIVE: To examine dry matter, energy and fat apparent digestibility, and fecal characteristics following dietary flaxseed mucilage supplementation alone or in combination with calcium.METHODS: A single-blinded crossover feeding trial was conducted on 11 privately owned dogs. During three consecutive 14-day periods, dogs where fed commercial dog food supplemented with potato starch (control diet), flaxseed mucilage or flaxseed mucilage and calcium. Feces from the past 2 days of each period were collected for analysis. Owners recorded fecal score (1-7: 1=very hard/dry feces, 2-3=ideal and 7=diarrhea).RESULTS: Apparent digestibility of fat was lower in both flaxseed mucilage diet (94.5±0.8%), and flaxseed mucilage and calcium diet (92.9±0.9%) compared with control diet (96.9±0.2%, P<0.0001) with fat digestibility in flaxseed mucilage and calcium diet being significantly lower than the diet supplemented with only flaxseed mucilage. Dry matter and energy digestibility was not significantly affected by diet. Fecal wet weight, dry weight and dry matter percentage was not affected by diet despite a higher fecal score for test diets (3.7±0.3) compared with control (2.8±0.2, P<0.007).CONCLUSION: In dogs, flaxseed mucilage decreased fat apparent digestibility and this effect was enhanced when combined with calcium. Dry matter and energy apparent digestibility was not affected. Decreased fecal quality may limit the acceptable level of supplementation. Further studies on incorporating flaxseed mucilage in pet food products for weight management are needed.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 13 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ijo.2016.139.

AB - BACKGROUND: In humans, dietary supplementation with flaxseed mucilage and calcium decrease apparent digestibility of fat and energy. These supplements could prove useful for weight management in dogs.OBJECTIVE: To examine dry matter, energy and fat apparent digestibility, and fecal characteristics following dietary flaxseed mucilage supplementation alone or in combination with calcium.METHODS: A single-blinded crossover feeding trial was conducted on 11 privately owned dogs. During three consecutive 14-day periods, dogs where fed commercial dog food supplemented with potato starch (control diet), flaxseed mucilage or flaxseed mucilage and calcium. Feces from the past 2 days of each period were collected for analysis. Owners recorded fecal score (1-7: 1=very hard/dry feces, 2-3=ideal and 7=diarrhea).RESULTS: Apparent digestibility of fat was lower in both flaxseed mucilage diet (94.5±0.8%), and flaxseed mucilage and calcium diet (92.9±0.9%) compared with control diet (96.9±0.2%, P<0.0001) with fat digestibility in flaxseed mucilage and calcium diet being significantly lower than the diet supplemented with only flaxseed mucilage. Dry matter and energy digestibility was not significantly affected by diet. Fecal wet weight, dry weight and dry matter percentage was not affected by diet despite a higher fecal score for test diets (3.7±0.3) compared with control (2.8±0.2, P<0.007).CONCLUSION: In dogs, flaxseed mucilage decreased fat apparent digestibility and this effect was enhanced when combined with calcium. Dry matter and energy apparent digestibility was not affected. Decreased fecal quality may limit the acceptable level of supplementation. Further studies on incorporating flaxseed mucilage in pet food products for weight management are needed.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication, 13 September 2016; doi:10.1038/ijo.2016.139.

U2 - 10.1038/ijo.2016.139

DO - 10.1038/ijo.2016.139

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 27528249

VL - 40

SP - 1884

EP - 1890

JO - International Journal of Obesity

JF - International Journal of Obesity

SN - 0307-0565

IS - 12

ER -

ID: 166493198