Comparison of the effects on insulin resistance and glucose tolerance of 6-mo high-monounsaturated-fat, low-fat, and control diets

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

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Comparison of the effects on insulin resistance and glucose tolerance of 6-mo high-monounsaturated-fat, low-fat, and control diets. / Due, Anette Pia; Larsen, Thomas Meinert; Hermansen, Kjeld; Stender, Steen; Holst, Jens Juul; Toubro, Søren; Martinussen, Torben; Astrup, Arne.

In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Vol. 87, No. 4, 2008, p. 855-862.

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articleResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Due, AP, Larsen, TM, Hermansen, K, Stender, S, Holst, JJ, Toubro, S, Martinussen, T & Astrup, A 2008, 'Comparison of the effects on insulin resistance and glucose tolerance of 6-mo high-monounsaturated-fat, low-fat, and control diets', American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 87, no. 4, pp. 855-862.

APA

Due, A. P., Larsen, T. M., Hermansen, K., Stender, S., Holst, J. J., Toubro, S., ... Astrup, A. (2008). Comparison of the effects on insulin resistance and glucose tolerance of 6-mo high-monounsaturated-fat, low-fat, and control diets. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 87(4), 855-862.

Vancouver

Due AP, Larsen TM, Hermansen K, Stender S, Holst JJ, Toubro S et al. Comparison of the effects on insulin resistance and glucose tolerance of 6-mo high-monounsaturated-fat, low-fat, and control diets. American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008;87(4):855-862.

Author

Due, Anette Pia ; Larsen, Thomas Meinert ; Hermansen, Kjeld ; Stender, Steen ; Holst, Jens Juul ; Toubro, Søren ; Martinussen, Torben ; Astrup, Arne. / Comparison of the effects on insulin resistance and glucose tolerance of 6-mo high-monounsaturated-fat, low-fat, and control diets. In: American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2008 ; Vol. 87, No. 4. pp. 855-862.

Bibtex

@article{3463aa5e7c9d45c3bf47a61b8d78c8cc,
title = "Comparison of the effects on insulin resistance and glucose tolerance of 6-mo high-monounsaturated-fat, low-fat, and control diets",
abstract = "Background: The effect of dietary fat and carbohydrate on glucose metabolism has been debated for decades. Objective: The objective was to compare the effect of 3 ad libitum diets, different in type and amount of fat and carbohydrate, on insulin resistance and glucose tolerance subsequent to weight loss. Design: Forty-six nondiabetic, obese [mean (±SEM) body mass index (in kg/m2): 31.2 ± 0.3] men (n = 20) and premenopausal women (n = 26) aged 28.0 ± 0.7 y were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 diets after ≥8{\%} weight loss: 1) MUFA diet (n = 16): moderate in fat (35-45{\%} of energy) and high in monounsaturated fatty acids (>20{\%} of energy); 2) LF diet (n = 18): low-fat diet (20-30{\%} of energy), and 3) control diet (n = 12): 35{\%} of energy as fat (>15{\%} of energy as saturated fatty acids). Protein accounted for 15{\%} of energy in all 3 diets. A 2-h oral-glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) was performed before and after the 6-mo dietary intervention. All foods were provided by a purpose-built supermarket. Results: After 6 mo, the MUFA diet reduced fasting glucose (-3.0{\%}), insulin (-9.4{\%}), and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance score (-12.1{\%}). Compared with the MUFA diet, the control diet increased these variables [1.4{\%} (P = 0.014), 21.2{\%} (P=0.030), and 22.8{\%} (P=0.015), respectively], as did the LF diet [1.4{\%} (P = 0.090), 13.1{\%} (P = 0.078), and 15.5{\%} (P = 0.095), respectively]. No significant group differences were detected in glucose or insulin concentrations during the OGTT, in the Matsudas index, in body weight, or in body composition. Conclusion: A diet high in monounsaturated fat has a more favorable effect on glucose homeostasis than does the typical Western diet in the short term and may also be more beneficial than the official recommended low-fat diet during a period of weight regain subsequent to weight loss. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00274729.",
author = "Due, {Anette Pia} and Larsen, {Thomas Meinert} and Kjeld Hermansen and Steen Stender and Holst, {Jens Juul} and S{\o}ren Toubro and Torben Martinussen and Arne Astrup",
year = "2008",
language = "English",
volume = "87",
pages = "855--862",
journal = "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition",
issn = "0002-9165",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of the effects on insulin resistance and glucose tolerance of 6-mo high-monounsaturated-fat, low-fat, and control diets

AU - Due, Anette Pia

AU - Larsen, Thomas Meinert

AU - Hermansen, Kjeld

AU - Stender, Steen

AU - Holst, Jens Juul

AU - Toubro, Søren

AU - Martinussen, Torben

AU - Astrup, Arne

PY - 2008

Y1 - 2008

N2 - Background: The effect of dietary fat and carbohydrate on glucose metabolism has been debated for decades. Objective: The objective was to compare the effect of 3 ad libitum diets, different in type and amount of fat and carbohydrate, on insulin resistance and glucose tolerance subsequent to weight loss. Design: Forty-six nondiabetic, obese [mean (±SEM) body mass index (in kg/m2): 31.2 ± 0.3] men (n = 20) and premenopausal women (n = 26) aged 28.0 ± 0.7 y were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 diets after ≥8% weight loss: 1) MUFA diet (n = 16): moderate in fat (35-45% of energy) and high in monounsaturated fatty acids (>20% of energy); 2) LF diet (n = 18): low-fat diet (20-30% of energy), and 3) control diet (n = 12): 35% of energy as fat (>15% of energy as saturated fatty acids). Protein accounted for 15% of energy in all 3 diets. A 2-h oral-glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) was performed before and after the 6-mo dietary intervention. All foods were provided by a purpose-built supermarket. Results: After 6 mo, the MUFA diet reduced fasting glucose (-3.0%), insulin (-9.4%), and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance score (-12.1%). Compared with the MUFA diet, the control diet increased these variables [1.4% (P = 0.014), 21.2% (P=0.030), and 22.8% (P=0.015), respectively], as did the LF diet [1.4% (P = 0.090), 13.1% (P = 0.078), and 15.5% (P = 0.095), respectively]. No significant group differences were detected in glucose or insulin concentrations during the OGTT, in the Matsudas index, in body weight, or in body composition. Conclusion: A diet high in monounsaturated fat has a more favorable effect on glucose homeostasis than does the typical Western diet in the short term and may also be more beneficial than the official recommended low-fat diet during a period of weight regain subsequent to weight loss. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00274729.

AB - Background: The effect of dietary fat and carbohydrate on glucose metabolism has been debated for decades. Objective: The objective was to compare the effect of 3 ad libitum diets, different in type and amount of fat and carbohydrate, on insulin resistance and glucose tolerance subsequent to weight loss. Design: Forty-six nondiabetic, obese [mean (±SEM) body mass index (in kg/m2): 31.2 ± 0.3] men (n = 20) and premenopausal women (n = 26) aged 28.0 ± 0.7 y were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 diets after ≥8% weight loss: 1) MUFA diet (n = 16): moderate in fat (35-45% of energy) and high in monounsaturated fatty acids (>20% of energy); 2) LF diet (n = 18): low-fat diet (20-30% of energy), and 3) control diet (n = 12): 35% of energy as fat (>15% of energy as saturated fatty acids). Protein accounted for 15% of energy in all 3 diets. A 2-h oral-glucose-tolerance test (OGTT) was performed before and after the 6-mo dietary intervention. All foods were provided by a purpose-built supermarket. Results: After 6 mo, the MUFA diet reduced fasting glucose (-3.0%), insulin (-9.4%), and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance score (-12.1%). Compared with the MUFA diet, the control diet increased these variables [1.4% (P = 0.014), 21.2% (P=0.030), and 22.8% (P=0.015), respectively], as did the LF diet [1.4% (P = 0.090), 13.1% (P = 0.078), and 15.5% (P = 0.095), respectively]. No significant group differences were detected in glucose or insulin concentrations during the OGTT, in the Matsudas index, in body weight, or in body composition. Conclusion: A diet high in monounsaturated fat has a more favorable effect on glucose homeostasis than does the typical Western diet in the short term and may also be more beneficial than the official recommended low-fat diet during a period of weight regain subsequent to weight loss. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00274729.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=42249098883&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 18400707

AN - SCOPUS:42249098883

VL - 87

SP - 855

EP - 862

JO - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

JF - American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

SN - 0002-9165

IS - 4

ER -

ID: 210054756