Illusory sensation of movement induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Illusory sensation of movement induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. / Christensen, Mark Schram; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Grey, Michael James; Vejlby, Alexandra Damgaard; Belhage, Bo; Nielsen, Jens Bo; Christensen, Mark Schram; Jensen, Jesper Lundbye; Grey, Michael James; Vejlby, Alexandra Damgaard; Belhage, Bo; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo.

I: P L o S One, Bind 5, Nr. 10, 2010, s. e13301.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Christensen, MS, Lundbye-Jensen, J, Grey, MJ, Vejlby, AD, Belhage, B, Nielsen, JB, Christensen, MS, Jensen, JL, Grey, MJ, Vejlby, AD, Belhage, B & Holm-Nielsen, JB 2010, 'Illusory sensation of movement induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation', P L o S One, bind 5, nr. 10, s. e13301. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0013301, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0013301

APA

Christensen, M. S., Lundbye-Jensen, J., Grey, M. J., Vejlby, A. D., Belhage, B., Nielsen, J. B., ... Holm-Nielsen, J. B. (2010). Illusory sensation of movement induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. P L o S One, 5(10), e13301. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0013301, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0013301

Vancouver

Christensen MS, Lundbye-Jensen J, Grey MJ, Vejlby AD, Belhage B, Nielsen JB o.a. Illusory sensation of movement induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. P L o S One. 2010;5(10):e13301. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0013301, https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0013301

Author

Christensen, Mark Schram ; Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper ; Grey, Michael James ; Vejlby, Alexandra Damgaard ; Belhage, Bo ; Nielsen, Jens Bo ; Christensen, Mark Schram ; Jensen, Jesper Lundbye ; Grey, Michael James ; Vejlby, Alexandra Damgaard ; Belhage, Bo ; Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo. / Illusory sensation of movement induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. I: P L o S One. 2010 ; Bind 5, Nr. 10. s. e13301.

Bibtex

@article{09920370f24a11dfb6d2000ea68e967b,
title = "Illusory sensation of movement induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation",
abstract = "Human movement sense relies on both somatosensory feedback and on knowledge of the motor commands used to produce the movement. We have induced a movement illusion using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex in the absence of limb movement and its associated somatosensory feedback. Afferent and efferent neural signalling was abolished in the arm with ischemic nerve block, and in the leg with spinal nerve block. Movement sensation was assessed following trains of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation applied over primary motor cortex, dorsal premotor cortex, and a control area (posterior parietal cortex). Magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex produced a movement sensation that was significantly greater than stimulation over the control region. Movement sensation after dorsal premotor cortex stimulation was less affected by sensory and motor deprivation than was primary motor cortex stimulation. We propose that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsal premotor cortex produces a corollary discharge that is perceived as movement.",
author = "Christensen, {Mark Schram} and Jesper Lundbye-Jensen and Grey, {Michael James} and Vejlby, {Alexandra Damgaard} and Bo Belhage and Nielsen, {Jens Bo} and Christensen, {Mark Schram} and Jensen, {Jesper Lundbye} and Grey, {Michael James} and Vejlby, {Alexandra Damgaard} and Bo Belhage and Holm-Nielsen, {Jens Bo}",
note = "CURIS 2010 5200 142",
year = "2010",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0013301",
language = "English",
volume = "5",
pages = "e13301",
journal = "P L o S One",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Illusory sensation of movement induced by repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

AU - Christensen, Mark Schram

AU - Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper

AU - Grey, Michael James

AU - Vejlby, Alexandra Damgaard

AU - Belhage, Bo

AU - Nielsen, Jens Bo

AU - Christensen, Mark Schram

AU - Jensen, Jesper Lundbye

AU - Grey, Michael James

AU - Vejlby, Alexandra Damgaard

AU - Belhage, Bo

AU - Holm-Nielsen, Jens Bo

N1 - CURIS 2010 5200 142

PY - 2010

Y1 - 2010

N2 - Human movement sense relies on both somatosensory feedback and on knowledge of the motor commands used to produce the movement. We have induced a movement illusion using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex in the absence of limb movement and its associated somatosensory feedback. Afferent and efferent neural signalling was abolished in the arm with ischemic nerve block, and in the leg with spinal nerve block. Movement sensation was assessed following trains of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation applied over primary motor cortex, dorsal premotor cortex, and a control area (posterior parietal cortex). Magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex produced a movement sensation that was significantly greater than stimulation over the control region. Movement sensation after dorsal premotor cortex stimulation was less affected by sensory and motor deprivation than was primary motor cortex stimulation. We propose that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsal premotor cortex produces a corollary discharge that is perceived as movement.

AB - Human movement sense relies on both somatosensory feedback and on knowledge of the motor commands used to produce the movement. We have induced a movement illusion using repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex in the absence of limb movement and its associated somatosensory feedback. Afferent and efferent neural signalling was abolished in the arm with ischemic nerve block, and in the leg with spinal nerve block. Movement sensation was assessed following trains of high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation applied over primary motor cortex, dorsal premotor cortex, and a control area (posterior parietal cortex). Magnetic stimulation over primary motor cortex and dorsal premotor cortex produced a movement sensation that was significantly greater than stimulation over the control region. Movement sensation after dorsal premotor cortex stimulation was less affected by sensory and motor deprivation than was primary motor cortex stimulation. We propose that repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation over dorsal premotor cortex produces a corollary discharge that is perceived as movement.

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0013301

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0013301

M3 - Journal article

VL - 5

SP - e13301

JO - P L o S One

JF - P L o S One

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 23207760