Exercise increases circulating GDF15 in humans

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftLetterForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Exercise increases circulating GDF15 in humans. / Kleinert, Maximilian; Clemmensen, Christoffer; Sjøberg, Kim Anker; Carl, Christian Strini; Jeppesen, Jacob Fuglsbjerg; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen; Kiens, Bente; Richter, Erik A.

I: Molecular Metabolism, Bind 9, 2018, s. 187-191.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftLetterForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Kleinert, M, Clemmensen, C, Sjøberg, KA, Carl, CS, Jeppesen, JF, Wojtaszewski, J, Kiens, B & Richter, EA 2018, 'Exercise increases circulating GDF15 in humans', Molecular Metabolism, bind 9, s. 187-191. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.molmet.2017.12.016

APA

Kleinert, M., Clemmensen, C., Sjøberg, K. A., Carl, C. S., Jeppesen, J. F., Wojtaszewski, J., ... Richter, E. A. (2018). Exercise increases circulating GDF15 in humans. Molecular Metabolism, 9, 187-191. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.molmet.2017.12.016

Vancouver

Kleinert M, Clemmensen C, Sjøberg KA, Carl CS, Jeppesen JF, Wojtaszewski J o.a. Exercise increases circulating GDF15 in humans. Molecular Metabolism. 2018;9:187-191. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.molmet.2017.12.016

Author

Kleinert, Maximilian ; Clemmensen, Christoffer ; Sjøberg, Kim Anker ; Carl, Christian Strini ; Jeppesen, Jacob Fuglsbjerg ; Wojtaszewski, Jørgen ; Kiens, Bente ; Richter, Erik A. / Exercise increases circulating GDF15 in humans. I: Molecular Metabolism. 2018 ; Bind 9. s. 187-191.

Bibtex

@article{d24b90995987466082f398150223519a,
title = "Exercise increases circulating GDF15 in humans",
abstract = "Objective: The growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) is a stress-sensitive circulating factor that regulates systemic energy balance. Since exercise is a transient physiological stress that has pleiotropic effects on whole-body energy metabolism, we herein explored the effect of exercise on a) circulating GDF15 levels and b) GDF15 release from skeletal muscle in humans.Methods: Seven healthy males either rested or exercised at 67{\%} of their VO2max for 1 h and blood was sampled from the femoral artery and femoral vein before, during, and after exercise. Plasma GDF15 concentrations were determined in these samples.Results: Plasma GDF15 levels increased 34{\%} with exercise (p < 0.001) and further increased to 64{\%} above resting values at 120 min (p < 0.001) after the cessation of exercise. There was no difference between the arterial and venous GDF15 concentration before, during, and after exercise. During a resting control trial, GDF15 levels measured in the same subjects were unaltered.Conclusions: Vigorous submaximal exercise increases circulating GDF15 levels in humans, but skeletal muscle tissue does not appear to be the source.",
keywords = "Skeletal muscle, Growth differentiation factor 15, Recovery, Physical activity",
author = "Maximilian Kleinert and Christoffer Clemmensen and Sj{\o}berg, {Kim Anker} and Carl, {Christian Strini} and Jeppesen, {Jacob Fuglsbjerg} and J{\o}rgen Wojtaszewski and Bente Kiens and Richter, {Erik A.}",
note = "CURIS 2018 NEXS 060",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1016/j.molmet.2017.12.016",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "187--191",
journal = "Molecular Metabolism",
issn = "2212-8778",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Exercise increases circulating GDF15 in humans

AU - Kleinert, Maximilian

AU - Clemmensen, Christoffer

AU - Sjøberg, Kim Anker

AU - Carl, Christian Strini

AU - Jeppesen, Jacob Fuglsbjerg

AU - Wojtaszewski, Jørgen

AU - Kiens, Bente

AU - Richter, Erik A.

N1 - CURIS 2018 NEXS 060

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - Objective: The growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) is a stress-sensitive circulating factor that regulates systemic energy balance. Since exercise is a transient physiological stress that has pleiotropic effects on whole-body energy metabolism, we herein explored the effect of exercise on a) circulating GDF15 levels and b) GDF15 release from skeletal muscle in humans.Methods: Seven healthy males either rested or exercised at 67% of their VO2max for 1 h and blood was sampled from the femoral artery and femoral vein before, during, and after exercise. Plasma GDF15 concentrations were determined in these samples.Results: Plasma GDF15 levels increased 34% with exercise (p < 0.001) and further increased to 64% above resting values at 120 min (p < 0.001) after the cessation of exercise. There was no difference between the arterial and venous GDF15 concentration before, during, and after exercise. During a resting control trial, GDF15 levels measured in the same subjects were unaltered.Conclusions: Vigorous submaximal exercise increases circulating GDF15 levels in humans, but skeletal muscle tissue does not appear to be the source.

AB - Objective: The growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) is a stress-sensitive circulating factor that regulates systemic energy balance. Since exercise is a transient physiological stress that has pleiotropic effects on whole-body energy metabolism, we herein explored the effect of exercise on a) circulating GDF15 levels and b) GDF15 release from skeletal muscle in humans.Methods: Seven healthy males either rested or exercised at 67% of their VO2max for 1 h and blood was sampled from the femoral artery and femoral vein before, during, and after exercise. Plasma GDF15 concentrations were determined in these samples.Results: Plasma GDF15 levels increased 34% with exercise (p < 0.001) and further increased to 64% above resting values at 120 min (p < 0.001) after the cessation of exercise. There was no difference between the arterial and venous GDF15 concentration before, during, and after exercise. During a resting control trial, GDF15 levels measured in the same subjects were unaltered.Conclusions: Vigorous submaximal exercise increases circulating GDF15 levels in humans, but skeletal muscle tissue does not appear to be the source.

KW - Skeletal muscle

KW - Growth differentiation factor 15

KW - Recovery

KW - Physical activity

U2 - 10.1016/j.molmet.2017.12.016

DO - 10.1016/j.molmet.2017.12.016

M3 - Letter

C2 - 29398617

VL - 9

SP - 187

EP - 191

JO - Molecular Metabolism

JF - Molecular Metabolism

SN - 2212-8778

ER -

ID: 189663508