Circulating metabolites associated with objectively measured sleep duration and sleep variability in overweight/obese participants: A metabolomics approach within the SATIN study

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Standard

Circulating metabolites associated with objectively measured sleep duration and sleep variability in overweight/obese participants : A metabolomics approach within the SATIN study. / Papandreou, Christopher; Camacho-Barcia, Lucia; García-Gavilán, Jesús; Hansen, Thea Toft; Hjorth, Mads Fiil; Halford, Jason C G; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi; Sjödin, Anders Mikael; Bulló, Mónica.

I: Sleep, Bind 42, Nr. 5, zsz030, 2019.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Papandreou, C, Camacho-Barcia, L, García-Gavilán, J, Hansen, TT, Hjorth, MF, Halford, JCG, Salas-Salvadó, J, Sjödin, AM & Bulló, M 2019, 'Circulating metabolites associated with objectively measured sleep duration and sleep variability in overweight/obese participants: A metabolomics approach within the SATIN study', Sleep, bind 42, nr. 5, zsz030. https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsz030

APA

Papandreou, C., Camacho-Barcia, L., García-Gavilán, J., Hansen, T. T., Hjorth, M. F., Halford, J. C. G., ... Bulló, M. (2019). Circulating metabolites associated with objectively measured sleep duration and sleep variability in overweight/obese participants: A metabolomics approach within the SATIN study. Sleep, 42(5), [zsz030]. https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsz030

Vancouver

Papandreou C, Camacho-Barcia L, García-Gavilán J, Hansen TT, Hjorth MF, Halford JCG o.a. Circulating metabolites associated with objectively measured sleep duration and sleep variability in overweight/obese participants: A metabolomics approach within the SATIN study. Sleep. 2019;42(5). zsz030. https://doi.org/10.1093/sleep/zsz030

Author

Papandreou, Christopher ; Camacho-Barcia, Lucia ; García-Gavilán, Jesús ; Hansen, Thea Toft ; Hjorth, Mads Fiil ; Halford, Jason C G ; Salas-Salvadó, Jordi ; Sjödin, Anders Mikael ; Bulló, Mónica. / Circulating metabolites associated with objectively measured sleep duration and sleep variability in overweight/obese participants : A metabolomics approach within the SATIN study. I: Sleep. 2019 ; Bind 42, Nr. 5.

Bibtex

@article{fb7451d62c0848f28a5180cf388fb7f2,
title = "Circulating metabolites associated with objectively measured sleep duration and sleep variability in overweight/obese participants: A metabolomics approach within the SATIN study",
abstract = "Objectives: To investigate the associations of circulating metabolites with sleep duration and sleep variability. We also assessed the ability of metabolites to discriminate between sleep duration and sleep variability categories.Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of 205 participants with overweight/obesity from the {"}Satiety Innovation{"} (SATIN) study. A targeted metabolite profiling (n = 159 metabolites) approach was applied using three different platforms (NMR, LC-MS, GC-MS). Associations between circulating metabolite concentrations and accelerometer-derived sleep duration and variability in sleep duration were assessed using elastic-net regression analysis. Ten-fold cross-validation was used to estimate the discriminative accuracy of metabolites for sleep duration, and sleep variability categories.Results: A metabolite profile, including acyl-carnitines (C11:0/C5:1-DC/iso-C11:0, 2-M-C4:1/3-M-C4:1, C4:0); sphingomyelins (42:1, 33:1); glycerol; stearic acid; 2- and 3- hydroxyl-butyric acid; docosahexaenoic acid; serotonin; and phosphatidylcholine (34:2), was significantly associated with high sleep duration (4th plus 5th quintile). Ten metabolites, including acyl-carnitines (C18:1, C7:0, C6-OH); phosphatidylcholine (40:6, 37:4, 42:5); lyso-phosphatidylcholine, (20:1); sucrose; glutamic acid, and triacylglycerol (52:4), were significantly associated with high sleep variability (4th plus 5th quintile). The area under the curve was 0.69 (95{\%} CI 0.62-0.75), and 0.63 (95{\%} CI 0.53-0.72), in the multi-metabolite score for high sleep duration, and sleep variability, respectively. The variance in sleep duration explained by metabolites was 7{\%}. No metabolites were selected for prediction of sleep variability (continuous).Conclusion: A small set of metabolites within distinct biochemical pathways were associated with high sleep duration and sleep variability. These metabolites appeared to moderately discriminate sleep duration and sleep variability categories.",
keywords = "Faculty of Science, Metabolomics, Sleep duration, Sleep variability, SATIN",
author = "Christopher Papandreou and Lucia Camacho-Barcia and Jes{\'u}s Garc{\'i}a-Gavil{\'a}n and Hansen, {Thea Toft} and Hjorth, {Mads Fiil} and Halford, {Jason C G} and Jordi Salas-Salvad{\'o} and Sj{\"o}din, {Anders Mikael} and M{\'o}nica Bull{\'o}",
note = "CURIS 2019 NEXS 086",
year = "2019",
doi = "10.1093/sleep/zsz030",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
journal = "Sleep (Online)",
issn = "0161-8105",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Circulating metabolites associated with objectively measured sleep duration and sleep variability in overweight/obese participants

T2 - A metabolomics approach within the SATIN study

AU - Papandreou, Christopher

AU - Camacho-Barcia, Lucia

AU - García-Gavilán, Jesús

AU - Hansen, Thea Toft

AU - Hjorth, Mads Fiil

AU - Halford, Jason C G

AU - Salas-Salvadó, Jordi

AU - Sjödin, Anders Mikael

AU - Bulló, Mónica

N1 - CURIS 2019 NEXS 086

PY - 2019

Y1 - 2019

N2 - Objectives: To investigate the associations of circulating metabolites with sleep duration and sleep variability. We also assessed the ability of metabolites to discriminate between sleep duration and sleep variability categories.Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of 205 participants with overweight/obesity from the "Satiety Innovation" (SATIN) study. A targeted metabolite profiling (n = 159 metabolites) approach was applied using three different platforms (NMR, LC-MS, GC-MS). Associations between circulating metabolite concentrations and accelerometer-derived sleep duration and variability in sleep duration were assessed using elastic-net regression analysis. Ten-fold cross-validation was used to estimate the discriminative accuracy of metabolites for sleep duration, and sleep variability categories.Results: A metabolite profile, including acyl-carnitines (C11:0/C5:1-DC/iso-C11:0, 2-M-C4:1/3-M-C4:1, C4:0); sphingomyelins (42:1, 33:1); glycerol; stearic acid; 2- and 3- hydroxyl-butyric acid; docosahexaenoic acid; serotonin; and phosphatidylcholine (34:2), was significantly associated with high sleep duration (4th plus 5th quintile). Ten metabolites, including acyl-carnitines (C18:1, C7:0, C6-OH); phosphatidylcholine (40:6, 37:4, 42:5); lyso-phosphatidylcholine, (20:1); sucrose; glutamic acid, and triacylglycerol (52:4), were significantly associated with high sleep variability (4th plus 5th quintile). The area under the curve was 0.69 (95% CI 0.62-0.75), and 0.63 (95% CI 0.53-0.72), in the multi-metabolite score for high sleep duration, and sleep variability, respectively. The variance in sleep duration explained by metabolites was 7%. No metabolites were selected for prediction of sleep variability (continuous).Conclusion: A small set of metabolites within distinct biochemical pathways were associated with high sleep duration and sleep variability. These metabolites appeared to moderately discriminate sleep duration and sleep variability categories.

AB - Objectives: To investigate the associations of circulating metabolites with sleep duration and sleep variability. We also assessed the ability of metabolites to discriminate between sleep duration and sleep variability categories.Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of 205 participants with overweight/obesity from the "Satiety Innovation" (SATIN) study. A targeted metabolite profiling (n = 159 metabolites) approach was applied using three different platforms (NMR, LC-MS, GC-MS). Associations between circulating metabolite concentrations and accelerometer-derived sleep duration and variability in sleep duration were assessed using elastic-net regression analysis. Ten-fold cross-validation was used to estimate the discriminative accuracy of metabolites for sleep duration, and sleep variability categories.Results: A metabolite profile, including acyl-carnitines (C11:0/C5:1-DC/iso-C11:0, 2-M-C4:1/3-M-C4:1, C4:0); sphingomyelins (42:1, 33:1); glycerol; stearic acid; 2- and 3- hydroxyl-butyric acid; docosahexaenoic acid; serotonin; and phosphatidylcholine (34:2), was significantly associated with high sleep duration (4th plus 5th quintile). Ten metabolites, including acyl-carnitines (C18:1, C7:0, C6-OH); phosphatidylcholine (40:6, 37:4, 42:5); lyso-phosphatidylcholine, (20:1); sucrose; glutamic acid, and triacylglycerol (52:4), were significantly associated with high sleep variability (4th plus 5th quintile). The area under the curve was 0.69 (95% CI 0.62-0.75), and 0.63 (95% CI 0.53-0.72), in the multi-metabolite score for high sleep duration, and sleep variability, respectively. The variance in sleep duration explained by metabolites was 7%. No metabolites were selected for prediction of sleep variability (continuous).Conclusion: A small set of metabolites within distinct biochemical pathways were associated with high sleep duration and sleep variability. These metabolites appeared to moderately discriminate sleep duration and sleep variability categories.

KW - Faculty of Science

KW - Metabolomics

KW - Sleep duration

KW - Sleep variability

KW - SATIN

U2 - 10.1093/sleep/zsz030

DO - 10.1093/sleep/zsz030

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 30722060

VL - 42

JO - Sleep (Online)

JF - Sleep (Online)

SN - 0161-8105

IS - 5

M1 - zsz030

ER -

ID: 213152890