A new method to study changes in microvascular blood volume in muscle and adipose tissue: Real time imaging in humans and rat

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A new method to study changes in microvascular blood volume in muscle and adipose tissue: Real time imaging in humans and rat. / Sjøberg, Kim Anker; Rattigan, Stephen; Hiscock, Natalie J; Richter, Erik A.; Kiens, Bente.

I: American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology, Bind 301, Nr. 2, 2011, s. H450-H458.

Publikation: Bidrag til tidsskriftTidsskriftartikelForskningfagfællebedømt

Harvard

Sjøberg, KA, Rattigan, S, Hiscock, NJ, Richter, EA & Kiens, B 2011, 'A new method to study changes in microvascular blood volume in muscle and adipose tissue: Real time imaging in humans and rat', American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology, bind 301, nr. 2, s. H450-H458. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpheart.01174.2010

APA

Sjøberg, K. A., Rattigan, S., Hiscock, N. J., Richter, E. A., & Kiens, B. (2011). A new method to study changes in microvascular blood volume in muscle and adipose tissue: Real time imaging in humans and rat. American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology, 301(2), H450-H458. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpheart.01174.2010

Vancouver

Sjøberg KA, Rattigan S, Hiscock NJ, Richter EA, Kiens B. A new method to study changes in microvascular blood volume in muscle and adipose tissue: Real time imaging in humans and rat. American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 2011;301(2):H450-H458. https://doi.org/10.1152/ajpheart.01174.2010

Author

Sjøberg, Kim Anker ; Rattigan, Stephen ; Hiscock, Natalie J ; Richter, Erik A. ; Kiens, Bente. / A new method to study changes in microvascular blood volume in muscle and adipose tissue: Real time imaging in humans and rat. I: American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology. 2011 ; Bind 301, Nr. 2. s. H450-H458.

Bibtex

@article{14ff220fbd3e4e949eb4401b89e2b24d,
title = "A new method to study changes in microvascular blood volume in muscle and adipose tissue: Real time imaging in humans and rat",
abstract = "We employed and evaluated a new application of contrast enhanced ultrasound for real time imaging of changes in microvascular blood volume (MVB) in tissues in females, males and rat. Continuous real time imaging was performed using contrast enhanced ultrasound to quantify infused gas filled microbubbles in the microcirculation. It was necessary to infuse microbubbles for a minimum of 5-7 min to obtain steady state bubble concentration, a prerequisite for making comparisons between different physiological states. Insulin clamped at a submaximal concentration (~75uU/ml) increased MBV by 27{\%} and 39{\%} in females and males, respectively and by 30{\%} in female subcutaneous adipose tissue, respectively. There was no difference in the ability of insulin to increase muscle MBV in females and males, and microvascular perfusion rate was not significantly increased by insulin. However, filling rate of the microvascular space was higher in females compared to males. In rats, insulin clamped at a maximal concentration increased muscle MBV by 70 {\%}. Large increases in microvascular volume and perfusion rate were detected during electrical stimulation of muscle in rats and immediately after exercise in humans. We have demonstrated that real time imaging of changes in MBV is possible in human and rat muscle and in subcutaneous adipose tissue and that the method is sensitive enough to pick up relatively small changes in MBV when performed with due consideration of steady state microbubble concentration. Due to real time imaging the method has wide applications for determining MBV in different organs during various physiological or pathophysiological conditions.",
author = "Sj{\o}berg, {Kim Anker} and Stephen Rattigan and Hiscock, {Natalie J} and Richter, {Erik A.} and Bente Kiens",
note = "CURIS 2011 5200 064",
year = "2011",
doi = "10.1152/ajpheart.01174.2010",
language = "English",
volume = "301",
pages = "H450--H458",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology",
issn = "0363-6135",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - A new method to study changes in microvascular blood volume in muscle and adipose tissue: Real time imaging in humans and rat

AU - Sjøberg, Kim Anker

AU - Rattigan, Stephen

AU - Hiscock, Natalie J

AU - Richter, Erik A.

AU - Kiens, Bente

N1 - CURIS 2011 5200 064

PY - 2011

Y1 - 2011

N2 - We employed and evaluated a new application of contrast enhanced ultrasound for real time imaging of changes in microvascular blood volume (MVB) in tissues in females, males and rat. Continuous real time imaging was performed using contrast enhanced ultrasound to quantify infused gas filled microbubbles in the microcirculation. It was necessary to infuse microbubbles for a minimum of 5-7 min to obtain steady state bubble concentration, a prerequisite for making comparisons between different physiological states. Insulin clamped at a submaximal concentration (~75uU/ml) increased MBV by 27% and 39% in females and males, respectively and by 30% in female subcutaneous adipose tissue, respectively. There was no difference in the ability of insulin to increase muscle MBV in females and males, and microvascular perfusion rate was not significantly increased by insulin. However, filling rate of the microvascular space was higher in females compared to males. In rats, insulin clamped at a maximal concentration increased muscle MBV by 70 %. Large increases in microvascular volume and perfusion rate were detected during electrical stimulation of muscle in rats and immediately after exercise in humans. We have demonstrated that real time imaging of changes in MBV is possible in human and rat muscle and in subcutaneous adipose tissue and that the method is sensitive enough to pick up relatively small changes in MBV when performed with due consideration of steady state microbubble concentration. Due to real time imaging the method has wide applications for determining MBV in different organs during various physiological or pathophysiological conditions.

AB - We employed and evaluated a new application of contrast enhanced ultrasound for real time imaging of changes in microvascular blood volume (MVB) in tissues in females, males and rat. Continuous real time imaging was performed using contrast enhanced ultrasound to quantify infused gas filled microbubbles in the microcirculation. It was necessary to infuse microbubbles for a minimum of 5-7 min to obtain steady state bubble concentration, a prerequisite for making comparisons between different physiological states. Insulin clamped at a submaximal concentration (~75uU/ml) increased MBV by 27% and 39% in females and males, respectively and by 30% in female subcutaneous adipose tissue, respectively. There was no difference in the ability of insulin to increase muscle MBV in females and males, and microvascular perfusion rate was not significantly increased by insulin. However, filling rate of the microvascular space was higher in females compared to males. In rats, insulin clamped at a maximal concentration increased muscle MBV by 70 %. Large increases in microvascular volume and perfusion rate were detected during electrical stimulation of muscle in rats and immediately after exercise in humans. We have demonstrated that real time imaging of changes in MBV is possible in human and rat muscle and in subcutaneous adipose tissue and that the method is sensitive enough to pick up relatively small changes in MBV when performed with due consideration of steady state microbubble concentration. Due to real time imaging the method has wide applications for determining MBV in different organs during various physiological or pathophysiological conditions.

U2 - 10.1152/ajpheart.01174.2010

DO - 10.1152/ajpheart.01174.2010

M3 - Journal article

C2 - 21622816

VL - 301

SP - H450-H458

JO - American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology

SN - 0363-6135

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 33716348